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2

This video went a long way to help me understand how differentials work and how resistance on one wheel translates to motion on the other. Around The Corner - How Differential Steering Works (1937)


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In order to change the speed of the inner and outer wheels, there must be additional torque(s), which must be different for the two wheels. What is this torque, and where does it come from? If the car is turning, there must be a torque relative to the center of mass of the car (note that torque is always relative to some axis; the torque on the car as a ...


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Sorry for my bad English. I believe that the confusion originates from a misunderstanding of the nature of rolling resistance. In the question the following is stated: If the wheels are being driven by the engine, then the torque is equal to rolling resistance on both wheels so both maintain a constant. That can only be stated if we assume the wheels are ...


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This is a simple explanation/observation. A two-wheel dolly rotates along a circular path by a constant torque (T). The position of the wheels changed from point 1 to point 2 in one second (t = 1s), what you can say about the distance that each wheel has traveled, and what is the speed of each wheel at the turn? ADD: I think it is imperative to understand ...


2

Let's imagine a car turns to the left 360 degrees, a complete clockwise circle. If we look at the tracks left, we see two concentric circles (For the front wheels, and another pair for the rear wheels, as shown on the diagram ), inner wheels turn in the inner circle which is smaller and outer wheels turn in the outer and larger circle. As per the diagram. ...


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TL;DR: The kinematic constraint imposes the redistribution of forces on the four wheels. This redistribution is permitted due to the car differential. IMHO it is easier understand this if you first understand the difference between kinematics and kinetics. kinematics: are about the geometry of motion (kinematics don't take into account forces or work). ...


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Newer cars have USB adapters built-in. This adapter can charge faster and can deliver higher wattage to small laptops too. They can also transfer data such as music and video from the phone to the screen on the dashpot. The old adapters come in different ratings, 1A and up. A good adaptor can charge a cell phone almost as fast as the wall outlet. Some of the ...


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The "charger" or charge controller is in the phone. The external device is a power supply. On connection by USB the phone will negotiate with the charger to see how much power the charger can supply. If your car's power supply doesn't support negotiation you may be limited to a charge current of 0.5 to 1 A and charging will take more time.


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Not necessarily. The critical element between the power supply and the phone is the charger. Most phone chargers are at 5V and even the USB 3 they provide (at the time of writing) current of about 3 Amps. This means a maximum power of 15 W (=5V * 3 A) The car batteries maybe at a lower voltage (V) but they can draw more current (I). (Even though most car ...


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No, it will be based on the output of the charger. Some do 1A others do 2.1A and some have 2 usb sockets. But be careful as some cars have the cigar lighter socket only live with the ignition on while others it is permanently live.


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