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1

Engineering decisions are fundamentally about problem solving. Thus, when asking, "Why not do [x] instead of [status quo]?" an answering question is: "What problem does [x] solve or what benefit does [x] provide versus existing designs?" If no satisfactory answer is forthcoming to the second question then that's the answer to the starting ...


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Solution Example 1: The object on the table would require a minimum force of $Mgk$. Example 2: The simplest way to the able the amount of force required to move the door hinge that has friction would be to look at a cross section of the component. The cross section would be a circle with two forces being applied. These force would cause torque which will be ...


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Take a look at the illustration below, which is how I understand your question. You're asking, what would be the minimum value for the blue arrows in order to make each object move? First, let's look at the simpler case - the red box. I don't think this needs another diagram - you've rightly stated in your question that if there is a coefficient of friction ...


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The reason tiles or flagstone or any other finishing is not used for heavy trrafic areas is lack of strength and toughness. Even in the decks you have attached photos these tiles/ stones will crack and dislodge due to differential heat expansion, vibration and water penetration to adhesive layer. They require a much higher level of maintenance. For roads and ...


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The minimum force required to swing the door open would not be equal to the minimum force to push the object off the table. Pushing the door that is attached to the door hinge would create different minimums of force required to push the door open as you could push the door at many different areas. In order to push a door open, you would need a certain ...


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They are less likely to be flipped over, blown away or turned inside-out in strong winds, because the gap allows the air that would normally be trapped to escape, but the second "cap" umbrella directs some of that down and toward the sides, providing some counterforce at the same time.


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They are designed to let the hot air out that collects at the top. Remember any hot fluid tends to rise, so allowing the hotter air to be vented helps cooling. I there is a gentle breeze will it make much difference - well looks good...


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The velocity of water varies with pipe diameter, flow rate and nature of materials . Most range is 0.6-1.5m/s .


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What the answer key seems to mean is to neglect the mass of air in the pipe, not its volume. That is, we want: $\rho_{pipe} = \frac{m_{rubber}+m_{steel}}{V_{pipe}} = \frac{\rho_{rubber}\cdot V_{rubber} + \rho_{steel}\cdot V_{steel}}{V_{pipe}} \propto \frac{\rho_{rubber}\cdot(R_{inside}^2 - R_{lining}^2) + \rho_{steel}\cdot(R_{outside}^2 - R_{inside}^2)}{R_{...


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