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0

It overloads brakes. The original Buick dynaflo auto trans had essentially free wheeling ( many decades ago) . They needed new drum brakes twice per year, depending on miles driven. Buick re-engineered the Dynaflo in a year or two to give engine braking.


5

If you are going down a hill, I believe coasting actually uses more fuel. The reason is that with modern fuel injection, leaving the engine in gear allows the engine to keep running without fuel being injected where as if you put the transmission in neutral (or use the clutch) the engine needs fuel to keep running at idle speed. On top of that is there is ...


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I assume because added complexity of the already complex transmission and you don't spend that much time actually coasting when driving because you are usually trying to maintain a constant speed which necessitates offsetting the frictional losses. The only time I coast is down hills when I am already accelerating due to gravity more than I want to, or ...


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I appear to have found an answer but I can not find the source to give credits. As the shafts are rotating there is a chance the dogs will collide but assuming there is lubrication, they will just slide on each other until they eventually fall into place and engage the gear.


2

The speed is not a factor but the acceleration of the person is. The equations are m= mass of the person $ \mu=friction\ index$ $\alpha= acceleration$ g=9.8ms^2 $\theta= angle\ of\ the\ ramp$ $$F_{net}=mgsin \theta-\mu mcos\theta=ma $$ Dividing both sides by m we get $$a= g sin\theta-\mu cos\theta$$ This is the acceleration downslope if the person is ...


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Contact motor vendors. They will be happy to recommend options. Their goal is to help you ultimately buy their offering for your product. I've seen where they recommend one option, and if it doesn't perform well enough, provide others at no (or reasonable) cost to help you get the right combination. This at least is my experience in big industry.


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