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It's not quite as simple as you are imagining it to be, but using geothermal heat as part of a multi-effect distillation plant or other type of plant is proven tech. But the prime use is for preheat. All the fun stuff still happens on the surface with vacuum distillation and membrane systems working on the preheated brackish water. For seawater desalination, ...


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No, because dumping water in the hot wells may cool the wells. Geothermal power systems are careful not to deplete hot wells, by adding only as much water they know they can boil. Besides, when you desalinate water, it's often for immediate use, often in he water supply system. Desalination is an expensive process....on the other hand, mitigation of water ...


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While temps below grade may be high, a "well" (I assume you mean oil well) wasn't drilled to let you extract heat from it. You are going to need some type of heat exchanger down there, or the first hundred gallons of water you put down there will just cool it off. Getting any type of piping or equipment into this well will be extremely ...


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Copper sheet with an absorbing and poor emitting coating is available which is easy to solder copper pipe to the untreated reverse side. Guess why many flat plate collectors are made like this… As for spacing you can get full details from Duffie & Beckmann Solar Thermal Engineering (can’t remember exact title, but it is a really good book) but panels I ...


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I'm surprised nobody has mentioned infrared radiation. Supposedly somebody has invented a paint that reflects so much energy that the self-radiation of its surface is greater than the incoming radiation, and it cools down below ambient temperature. https://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2021/Q2/the-whitest-paint-is-here-and-its-the-coolest.-literally..html


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I have a water cooled air conditioner. It takes cool water in and returns hot water to the floor drain, cooling the room next door.


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In addition to the volumetric efficiency of the valve timing system, there are some harsh losses associated with thermal losses. The top of the cylinder is hotter than the bottom end, and heat transfers down the cylinder liner at a rate that doesn't depend on rpm. So more heat is wasted per stroke (which is a poor way of saying it) when the engine is running ...


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Your assumption that the force acting on the crankshaft for a given crank angle $δ$ is constant regardless of the rpm of the engine is false. A primary reason why this is the case is, unlike what we generally assume, the intake and exhaust valves don't open or close exactly at TDC (top dead center) or BDC (bottom dead center). The timing of the opening and ...


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This is because the valve timing is optimized for a certain RPM, which represents the design point of the engine. In the case of a piston engine for use in an airplane, the opening and closing of the intake and exhaust valves is timed for optimum performance (i.e., maximum work extracted from the combustion process) at 2400-2600 RPM, while on a Suzuki GS1000 ...


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Answers to some of your queries: I bought this in a hardware store a few months ago and tried to use it in my car bc my AC would take 20 mins to cool the interior (98' F weather). Your car AC is faulty. The air was sortof cool but it seemed like it wasn't any cooler than what I had in my car and it said it works better when you freeze some of the ...


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Heat's gotta go somewhere? One idea would be to deposit underground in geothermal coils.........


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Theoretically? Sure. From a practical standpoint? No. At least, it's pretty hard to see that working in any feasible way. Regardless of what you do with the waste heat, you would need an inexhaustible supply of fresh air to cool the hot refrigerant. So the question is what to do with that hot air. As someone suggested, you could cool that with, say, ...


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Edit 1 based on the current version of the question "Where can heat be vented from an air conditioner that isn't outside, in the attic, or into the ground?" Answer: It is possible to put the heat into something like a large water tank. The problem is that you have to take the heat out of the water tank eventually. This is the heat battery ...


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