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Its called a chiller rack - fridges are designed to be insulated (keep out heat), while a chiller rack pumps in coolant (often cooled water from a refrigeration unit, either on the rack itself or elsewhere. Its not enough to keep pumping in cold air, or to keep heat out (when you're cooling heat generating devices), you need to vent it somewhere (outside? ...


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Heat transfer capacity The main problem is that a refrigerator is not potent enough for a server or a PC. A refrigerator is a type of heat pump that takes heat energy from a cool environment and transfers it to a hotter environment. On both sides, it uses convection with the natural flow of air (as opposed to forced convection). If you look at the history of ...


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To address the problem from a more abstract, physical point of view: The problem with servers is that they produce heat. This heat has to be deduced somehow. If it isn’t, the server will heat up more and more until it breaks. Apart from temperature-dependent performance differences of the server, it doesn’t matter much at which temperature the server resides,...


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A typical residential refrigerator has a coefficient of performance in the neighborhood of 3, and a 150W compressor. This means it can reject heat at a rate of 150W*3=450W. This is of course just a ballpark number: some refrigerators are bigger or smaller, and the coefficient of performance will depend on things like the temperature differential between the ...


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Here's a webpage from a random guy who put a light bulb in his refrigerator to see what would happen, and took careful data to monitor it. Results: The next experiment was to put a 60-watt incandescent light bulb inside the fridge. ... Over the next 55 minutes, I saw the temperature in the fridge slowly creep up, while the fridge's compressor ran ...


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We do. It's just an up-sized (i.e. more powerful) version of a refrigerator known as an air conditioning unit. Essentially all server rooms and most spaces where PCs are located (speaking for the U.S., at least) are air conditioned. Server rooms almost universally have dedicated HVAC systems and they will indeed be designed to keep the room at a more-or-less ...


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They've been doing that with computers for 30+ years. Back when computers were the size of refrigerators. They use to get a regular air conditioner. Build a platform for the computer to stand on. A hole in the center of the platform. Then duct the air conditioner to the bottom of the platform. Forced air rose through the computer. For your needs - can ...


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The price-to-effect ratio for heat pumps is just not there for any large scale applications. Especially since air or watercooling is far less complex, and therefore a lot, lot cheaper. Dust is actually not a problem, just put the air intake through a room with filters (just like most mid- to high end PC cases have nowadays). For watercooled server centers, ...


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A refrigerator is basically a heat pump designed to achieve a temperature close to 0 °C. There are a couple of problems here: Most refrigerators are way too weak to effectively tackle the heat output of modern PCs. It will not magically make your PC 6 °C - instead the PC will de-cool all your groceries. Condensation. Computers and electronics do not like ...


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refrigerator boxes tend to generate condensate There are specifications for acceptable relative humidity (RH) for servers. Air conditioning in server rooms will maintain RH within the allowed limits as well as maintaining temperature limits. You can't risk having condensation forming on electrical wiring or circuit boards as it will disrupt operation. ...


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The word "convert" is reserved for units that measure the same quantity (like distance in inches or cm). In this case however you need to use the word "calculate" because the units are dissimilar. Yes, the Darcy's Law equation is what you are looking for. In SI units, permeability "k" is measured in m2. In SI units, porous ...


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