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Best demonstration I ever saw was using an old metal motor car oil can. The physics teacher put an inch or so of water in it and brought it to the boil over a bunsen burner. Once boiling it was removed from the heat an the lid screwed on tightly. The cooling vapour inside and the air pressure crushed the can over relatively short time. Once crushed, it was ...


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If you want to test, you can use this online FREE orifice plate calculator.. FREE Orifice Plate Calculator


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The discharge coefficient is a function of many factors, therefore, it will not be the same for liquids and gases. The discharge coefficient is a ratio between the effective flow area and geometric flow area of an opening. The effective area changes based on fluid properties and compressibility effects. http://kb.eng-software.com/eskb/ask-an-engineer/theory-...


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The conversions can be found at this wikipedia page $$ 1 \frac{m^3}{s} = 1000 [NLPM] \frac{T_{gas}}{293.15}\cdot\frac{14.696 [psi]}{P_{gas}} = 1000 [SLPM] \frac{T{gas}}{273.15}\cdot\frac{14.504 [psi]}{P_{gas} [psi]} $$ where: $T_{gas}$: is the temperature that the gas is flowing $P_{gas}$: is the pressure that the gas is flowing


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