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3

No. We can show this with math. The first gear pair has a ratio of 1:2, and the second pair has a ratio of 2:1. So, discounting losses, for every turn of the input shaft, the second shaft will make 1/2 of a turn. For the second pair, for every turn of the second shaft, the third shaft will turn twice. We can then multiply these together to see how many turns ...


7

if you have them in line like the following picture then NO. The first and the last gear will have the same speed and the same torque (actually slightly less due to losses). if you wanted to retain a mechanical advantage you'd need 3 shafts and at least 4 gears like in the following image.


1

Since you want to just position the platform from position A to position B (and I suspect that the motion is horizontal i.e. gravity does not get involved), then the main torque you need to overcome is due to losses on the pulleys. However, the problem there is that the losses on the pulleys will be depended on many factors: load (platform + any weight on ...


1

I had the same question!! And you're correct. Some student at MIT put together a webpage with the energy/torque shares of the stator/impeller and turbine. It's like an extra impeller that utilizes the energy by fluid exiting the turbine, but disengages when inefficient. https://web.mit.edu/2.972/www/reports/torque_converter/torque_converter.htm The best ...


2

Since you will be using a guide, then my thoughts are the following. Assume at some point the rod forms an angle $\phi$. General Idea Since you are pushing up the platform the downward component of the force is equal to the reaction on the pivot below the platform $R_{1y}$. this will create a horizontal component on the rod which will need to satisfy the ...


2

The position of the calipers isn't what you are adjusting, it's the pressure you exert on them. Assuming the system is relatively slow (break force ramps up and down ~1 second), then a spring which is tensioned by a servo should work fine for this. If the spring is stretched further, the breaking force will be increased. Notice that even though the cable is ...


3

The basic thing you are looking at is a dynamometer - a generator mounted on trunnions to measure the reactive force. So, look at those then use a smaller motor as a generator - the ones I used were capable of controlling 100 to 150 kW - a bit large for what you describe.


4

The bicycle disk as shown is inherently prone to shimmying and spiraling into an increasing flutter. I have an Ebike with a very similar disk brake and I have learned my lesson to be cautious with it. As for controlled caliper force, one could use a scissor mechanism with a hook on the bottom which could be loaded by the desired weights as per the schematic ...


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