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Your calculation is generally correct . The basic formula is: $$\tau_{max} = \frac{T*r_1}{J}$$ Although the Torque is constant ($2.5 [Nm]$), what changes is the radii and the second moment of area. For solid sections $$J_{solid} = \frac{\pi r^4}{4}$$ For hollow sections $$J_{hollow} = \frac{\pi \left(r_o^4 - r_i^4\right)}{4}$$ where: $r_o$: the external ...


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Even though the spur gear tooth is moved by one rotation, there is a force associated with it which is related to the friction (or in general the load on the spur gear). To simplify things, let's assume that the system is in steady state (i.e. no angular acceleration). In that case you don't need to worry about inertial effects. So, lets assume that the ...


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Your diagram is not right. There are two major kinds of stresses, bending moment on the clamp, and tension due to the radial compression. Their distribution is complex and indeterminate. it depends on the geometry of the clamp. the narrower it is the more principal stress is tension until ultimately it is functioning as a strap and all stress is tension, ...


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Ankling is to make up for the inefficiencies of turning a crank with a device designed to walk/run. So unless you have a stupid designer who make the input power inefficient (thanks, evolution), there is no need to create complex linkages that help turn a crank that helps account for muscle contraction and extra movement. A crank is used to turn linear ...


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This answer covers the disadvantages, as I am unable to find any advantages. Your answer is something you've written into the question. "It uses the fewest simplest parts to enable the linear movement to be translated to circular movement of the wheels." The reason cyclist use ankling is the "engine" driving the mechanism is very low ...


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