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Your systems shows extremely close pole-zero cancellation. So much even that it nearly removes 4 poles and zeros. Lets look at why, starting with the Bode plot: The magnitude plot is constantly decreasing with a slope of -40dB/decade. Following basic rules this already implies that at the given frequencies, the system can be approximated using a double ...


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It all boils down to the numbers. The constants in your TF basically seem to describe an integrator with some "disturbance" somewhere in the frequency. The easy way for the whole clear picture is factorise both numerator and denominator to see where poles and zeros are. Your graphs being able to show them depends on the scale limits you set and on ...


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NOT AN ANSWER This is not an answer, its more a praise to an unsung facet of the genius of a much celebrated architect. The title of the question (minus the word control) reminded me of an experience I wanted to share (which is relevant is a very generic way). When I visited Barcelona (sometime in the previous millennium), I had already a few years of ...


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H-infinity control uses just as any other controller the outputs to compute a new input. Internally, it does store some kind of linear combination of previous outputs and inputs that assure the resulting control signal stabilizes the system and achieves the control goal. This can be compared to how a LQR + Observer works, the observer estimates something ...


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A transfer function of a closed-loop feedback control system is written in the form: $$ T(s) = \frac{H(s)}{G(s)} $$ where $G(s)$ is called the characteristic polynomial of the system. The poles and zeros of the system are defined: Zeros $\rightarrow$ Roots of $H(s)$ Poles $\rightarrow$ Roots of $G(s)$ The stability of the closed-loop system can be ...


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Let us take a lumped mass approach to model the thermal dynamics of the region across two zone, including the convection and conduction and approximate the state $T_4 \approx \frac{T_2 + T_3}{2}$. Further, assuming that the heat flow is dominated by convection, we can apply the Newton's law of cooling (or heating) to obtain the heat flow rates and therefore ...


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