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Figure 1. Silicone steel stamped lamination, stator and rotor. Image source:HS Magnets Figure 2. On their way to becoming motors.


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If I understand correctly, your question is "Why do we use a unit strain instead of something more meaningful like a percent strain?". The reason is that we are normalising with respect to a well-defined (and easily comprehensible) quantity. This is a very common theme in material science. If you look at the definition of the modulus of elasticity,...


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With the different masks you can in 2D decide what pattern you want where on the chip. Transistors are nothing more than a few regions on the silicon that have been exposed to get more or less electrons, so they're conductive. On a chip, you're not going to be gluing any standard components as it's far too small for that. You'll have to look at what the ...


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I don't get what per unit strain is and why we're using it. When you have a quantity expressed as "per unit (of) X", you get two things. First, you can recover the value of the quantity for any X by just multiplying (assuming that the relationship is linear). That's what multiplication does - it just scales some base value up or down. So you can ...


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You will need more than a 220V:12V transformer. Fullwave bridge rectifier output: $$ V_{DC} = 0.637\ V_{MAX} = 0.9\ V_{RMS}$$ This is the generic formula (textbooks), which gives you 10.8V. Higher current may cause < 10.8V. Lower current > 10.8V. As in: the actual voltage depends on the load current. From Full Wave Rectifier. The peak voltage of a ...


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The following pins appear to be pogo pins or spring loaded pins Below are example of pogo pins The following appear to be swage mount connectors Here is an example Reference: Mill-max How to pair the Retekess SU-668 Restaurant Paging System


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Welp, it appears NMech above this is right about using the chip's clock as the basis for the pulses. I don't quite fully understand the code yet, but using code from https://www.exploreembedded.com/wiki/LPC1768:_Timers for prescalar microsecond code and https://www.electronicshub.org/how-to-use-timer-in-lpc1768/ for the rest. I set the prescalar to be based ...


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Although I am not an expert on this, I have some experience with coding stepper motors. Regarding the code (if you are using Arduino as I am guessing), the use of the wait function blocks any code execution for approximately 0.001 [s] and then resumes. However, that does not guarantee that the execution of the next step is at exactly every 0.001. A better ...


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While I completely agree with @NMech's answer, let me take a different approach. As I see it, the problem is that you're forgetting something: look at the right-hand side of that equation: $IR_gG_F$. Now, I don't know anything about the subject you're looking at about voltage drops or what have you. But I'm willing to bet that if you calculate that, you'll ...


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So, the answer is obviously that the inner pin sticks out too much. I couldn't stop fiddling and I got a spark when connecting. It's also entirely possibly to reverse the polarity albeit like 0% chance of it happening with normal use. Found a simple solution though... I cut a piece of plastic from cotton swab and grabbed a thin iron ring. I widened the ...


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I do not know if you are still interested in this, but I started working on this issue right now and found two solutions, principally one drive is master and another is set to follow it either as position control (I preferer this) or as torque control. I have found these on this topic: Equipment. 2 x Control Techniques Unidrves (Whatever size) 2 x 1024 PPR ...


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Your described motor constant = peak voltage / rotational speed under no load. The latter decreases if your motor resistance increases. Inertia is obviously going to increase with a thicker shaft.


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