81

I have actually stuck a knife into a toaster, and I can confirm that yes, it is very definitely electrified. Please, Please, Please, don't do this. The only reason I'm still alive is because of a good fusebox / safety switch and the fact that my hand spasmed in such a way that I let go of the knife.


59

The toaster is going to have heating elements of a type of wire that has very high resistance, usually nichrome wire. When electricity is applied to the wire, it becomes hot enough to toast bread. You'll notice if you look closely that the wire is supported by some form of non-conducting brackets, sometimes ceramic. This prevents the wire from following a ...


21

These types of motor configurations are used in the cellphone's vibrate/buzzer function. Here is a Youtube video demonstrating the vibrate function and two other references: How it works:Cell phone vibration motor? iPhone 5 / 5S Vibrator Motor Replacement Vibration Motors by Precision Microdrives Click on image for a larger version of the image. These are ...


15

It's a naked piezoelectric buzzer. Some piezoelectric crystal grown on a metal circle are the active part and the bottom contact glued on the back cover. The top is then metallised to get the second contact. Wires could be soldered to the contacts and/or the device could be cased in some plastic box but, since space is a premium here, it's used as is without ...


13

How could they possibly sell a consumer-oriented product like that which zaps its users if they happen to touch the interior slightly as they stick a knife into the piece of toast bread to get it out from the toaster when it inevitably gets stuck sometimes? Or is too hot to use your fingers? Consider your own perspective. This sentence shows an expectation ...


10

Why would they have the metal parts responsible for pressing against the bread and keep it in place be having electricity going through it? They don't. The metal parts responsible for pressing against the bread are not electrified. The electrified parts are behind the wires which press against the bread. You can see them, touch them, burn yourself on them, ...


7

When the timer reaches zero, the microwave tube is turned off. Depending on your house wiring, this large reduction in load may allow the line voltage to rise a bit. The fan, which continues to run for a few seconds in order to get rid of the built-up heat, speeds up a bit as well.


6

That is a micro vibrating motor to produce the "buzz" effect from your phone. I used much much larger vibrating motors, air driven, on the bottom of my Class 7 dump truck. Mounted under the bed, they would vibrate the bed, loosening the material so it would flow out cleanly.


6

Yes, and no. When the toaster is actually toasting, then obviously there's electricity running through the elements, which need to get hot (and will be seen to glow). Once it's turned off, but still plugged into the mains, electricity is not flowing through the elements. If it was, they'd still be glowing. However, poking anything inside may touch something ...


5

Power Consumption The shortest answer to your question is to look at the amount of power consumed by some of the consoles you listed as examples: Nintendo 64: 19 W Playstation 1: 15 W (supply) XBox 360: 115 - 200 W (supply, depends on model) Playstation 4: 165 - 250 W (supply, depends on model) As you can see, compared to their predecessors, modern ...


4

The basic problem is that the power source is not matched to produce exactly the right voltage and current that the LED takes to put out the light you want. Some conversion is required between the power source and the LED. Converting DC at one voltage and current to another voltage and current is done most efficiently with pulses. It isn't too hard to ...


4

A toaster is simply a length of nichrome wire put across the mains power, which will be 120 or 240 VAC, depending on your country: Those red-hot wires you see in the toaster? That's the nichrome wire. If you stick a knife in the toaster and it contacts the nichrome wire, you're making a potentiometer: By inserting the knife at the appropriate location, you ...


3

I'll answer the questions in reverse order. If the laser beam draws like a pencil, how is the laser guiding mirror that directs the laser beam onto the drum able to move so fast that a page is printed every few seconds? Figure 1. A simplified drawing of the laser and mirror arrangement. Source: How Stuff Works. The mirror in many cases just ...


3

The reason for the humming noise is improper grounding. Audio signals are low voltage level AC signals (over simplified). An audio signal could be for example 1V, 1 KHz signal. When there is improper grounding, a low level noise signal example 10mV 50Hz can get coupled to the audio signal causing humming. (Values are made up) I would suggest installing ...


3

Modern power adapters tend to be electronically regulated and not vary much in output voltage with load changes. Older ones that used iron core transformers were often less stable in output voltage with Vout rising to a substantially higher than specified value on no load. If you are 'lucky' the camera load may have reduced the voltage enough to prevent ...


3

The reason LED's are blinking is because they use Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) power the LED. Using PWM, the LED are switched on for a specific period of time and switch off rest of the time. The reason as suggested is Efficiency. Over a period of time LED used less power, or in other words less average current The LED dissipates less heat, thus will ...


3

The isotope used in smoke detectors, americium-241, has a half-life of 432 years. It would take a very long time for simple radioactive decay to affect the operation of a smoke detector.


3

What you ask for won't work. First, if you were to create a current amplifier as you describe, it would require a separate power source. You can't cheat physics. Twice the current out at the same voltage means twice the power. The additional power has to come from somewhere other than the input current. If you have additional power available, it would ...


3

Inside the toaster is a special type of wire, usually a nickel-chromium (Nichrome) alloy, that has a high resistance and lasts reasonably long at glowing-orange temperatures. It will be mounted on insulators, for a reason. If you are using 120VAC, one end of that wire will be connected to the AC Neutral and the other end to AC Line, through a switch that ...


3

I just to want to add a caveat here for people reading this who might read these answers and think the advice applies to all electrical devices. For a toaster, sure, turning if off and removing the mains power will render it inactive, however this does not apply to electrical devices with capacitors. Capacitors can hold a charge even when the device is ...


3

Looking at photos of the battery used in your headphones, I believe they use one of two ways to do this: 1- The cells are parallel in orientation, leading me to believe they are electrically parallel. The IC could be matching them somehow, or perhaps the voltage is slightly different, as the eneloops are low discharge cells. the second, more likely scenario: ...


3

Based on the information shared and available there mostly three more possibilities. There is a make break switch that is triggered based on the battery packaging. Review the original battery package as well as the housing compartment for specific mechanical features associated with a trigger. Below are some battery packs that are similar to original. The ...


3

Another option would be to use a vacuum cleaner, that way any dirt is not pushed inside the computer but its pulled outside.


2

Theoretically TP4056 is capable of charging at 1.4A. Practically your design is limited to the capability of the USB source par the picture or your external source. You need to change the resistor on Program pin on the TP4056 to the desired charge current Per the circuit above the resistor is R4. Also from the LTC4056 data sheet: PROG (Pin 5): Charge ...


2

That isn't how they work at all. The smoke does not "block" the radiation in that way. And even if it did, a decay in the rate of emission would make the detector more sensitive, not less. The theory is that uncontaminated air is relatively hard to ionize, while air with smoke in it is easily ionized, for example, by an alpha particle emitted by a small ...


2

SSR or Solid State Relay is what you are after. You should be able to trigger this one right off the 3 volt rpi gpio. FOTEK SSR-40DA. Here is a DC one CPC1709J. Use a voltage divider or zener diode so you dont exceed the 1.2v input. You will likely need a heat sink. You may want to consider using a mosfet instead and running higher frequency. Higher ...


2

There are too many wrong assumptions in your question. No, there are certainly theoretical limits on the resolution CRTs can reach. The electron beam is never a perfect point when it hits the screen. At the lowest level, electrons are probability functions. However, well above that, you can't get them to line up perfectly in a straight line, even at the ...


2

that thing is indeed an loudspeaker- just a small one. it operates on exactly the same principles as a full-size loudspeaker. because it doesn't take much movement of air in a headphone to fry your eardrums, these little guys don't require soft surrounds to accomodate large cone excursions. the flexure of the material itself is adequate for use as a surround....


2

Have you considered a solar oven? The kind that sits in the sun and is heated by the sun's rays with no electricity or other power source. For cooking it'd be more efficient than a PV system. Obviously it wouldn't work at night so it might not meet your needs.


2

That long audio cable is acting like an aerial. Does it run close to any mains wires - in the wall perhaps? You will be better off getting a quality shielded audio cable as a first step. If that does not work then you have to consider some filtering.


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