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At the very high level you will need 24V Power supply or a method to generate 24V 24V Motor controller Microcontroller - Arduino is a good place to start There are also prebuild motor controllers that can be programed via computer. These tend to be expensive. I would suggest following web sites similar to the ones listed below. They tend to have blogs, ...


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TL;DR: Use only the things/concepts you need for an application. First I'll just say, that the D term is not recommended for the particular system that you are describing. A PI control would be much more appropriate. I'll try to reiterate some points already made here from my point of view. In order for a control system to work properly the time between ...


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The derivative is the rate of change of the error, $ \frac {de}{dt} $. The current position (at t = Ns) is 80 m, and the previous position (at t = (N-1) s) was 60 m. ... this gives a derivative error of (20 - 40)/1s = -20 m/s. Correct error is negative. As you pass through the target position (with the figures you've given us) the error will be zero but ...


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Adding to the other answers. I just so happen to have done exactly this. I used a windshield wiper motor and a potentiometer but the principal is the same. Here's my arduino source code: https://pastebin.com/0ezsmi4y And a short video I took of it in action. This is an alternate version that takes RC PWM input instead of serial. I think all the talk about ...


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You are at the right track. As the DC motor is rather fast for a potential slow microcontroller, using a discrete controller will improve the reliability and stability of the closed-loop system. Even though a DC motor is rather easy to model (speaking of the basic dynamics upto the 3rd order), using system identification can improve parameter estimation ...


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