13

See the .gif below! EDIT: You may need to enable visibility of these handles if they're not on by default - it depends on your default profile/settings.


10

Yes, this is normal. By default, SolidWorks renders curves on the screen using less than the highest possible level of detail that your monitor is capable of displaying. The point of this is to allow the screen to be redrawn quickly as you edit your design and change the view. The more detailed the curve, the longer it takes to redraw the screen; depending ...


6

This is information to be shown on the printed copy - it is telling the reader to please not print this A1 drawing sheet on A4 paper, or else the information you have highlighted "Scale 1:8" would not be true any more.


5

This type of feature is typically called a "loft", but I would caution you that this should be used only if needed. Lofted features will cost you a lot of money if you try to get them machined. If you're going with 3d printing it doesn't matter too much (complexity is free). That said, here's some pictures of before: And after a "loft" command: When you ...


5

A cogged positioning system uses the concept of a detent - a pin, ball, pawl or bump that fits against a mating cavity. Usually there is some kind of spring to allow the detent to disengage when enough force is applied. This gives the familiar click as a knob is rotated. So to answer the question the interface is called a detent. Google search detent ball ...


5

You don't need to dimension it at all, because as you probably know, that part would never be manufactured by looking at the 2D. At my company, one of the standard notes we put on every drawing is "Referring to solid model for geometry not dimensioned is permissible. All unspecified surfaces must match solid model within .020 in. (and we put the .020 in a ...


5

To convert a plot of J versus s to a plot of J/s vs s, take the derivative. Here is my quick-and-dirty answer after digitizing the data.


5

There are many possible culprits. One of them is the following. Check in the lower right corner of your Solidworks window. you should see if you click on it, you should see the following menu. You might have pressed it accidentally.


4

Yes. You need to use the "Auxilliary View" tool, but, this is only able to accept an 'edge' as an input, so you can't use a plane. Usually, one would use this to create a 'view looking at a face', but in your case, there is no such face, and so no edge in the drawing view to select. The workaround for this is to create a sketch entity, set ...


3

Teeth on gears generally will not slip if your pitch and tooth profiles match properly, since the teeth would have to break off to slip. Minimizing backlash can be done by tight tolerance control. Looking at the images you have it appears as though you've designed the teeth more freeform and by eye, rather than calculating the profiles (I could be wrong ...


3

I'm not familiar with the Solidworks equal constraint but it sounds like this should be done parametrically in Fusion. Dimension the first line to a value. Then, dimension the second one, but instead of typing in a value, click on the dimension of the first line. It will set it to something like 'd1' and then if you change your first dimension, the second ...


3

You might be interested in Smart Components / Smart Features. This technique will associate parts with features. As for the naming, we call those "Press Nuts", or more generically "Press Hardware"


3

No this is not possible, as it would distort the part. You may be able to achieve an acceptable view with the following techniques: Broken Views- These would allow you to cut out the long sections between the flanges allowing one to visualize the whole beam. Hiding lines - with a zoomed out view you can hide the lines that are blending together to only show ...


3

Your issue is that you're assuming the key and key way will have exactly the same dimensions. In reality the key will have to be slightly smaller than the keyway. What yo want to do is start with the concentricity, then use the width, or parallel mate to line up the key and keyway. This way you're not over-constraining the assembly. Solidworks sometimes ...


3

Deselect this option and it will return to the assembly.


3

The coincident relation at the bottom of the line on the right will prevent you from moving it horizontally. It is overdefined because your 20.75 dimension is probably too short or too long to reach the corner that the right-hand yellow line is coincident too. Your line is also vertical, meaning that it cannot move only the upper point of the yellow line to ...


3

"Why" - This is not 'uncertainty' - it is displaying a tolerance. As far as the software is concerned, your part is exactly 14.40mm. The feature that you are using, however, is not used to communicate to the software how large the part should be (that will be the sketch that defined your body), but rather it's used to communicate to a human how ...


3

Have a look at some of the advanced mates. For example limit mates : https://help.solidworks.com/2018/english/SolidWorks/sldworks/t_Limit_Mates_SWassy.htm I reckon that'll do what you need. Or you can get even fancier by defining a mate along a path. Good luck : https://help.solidworks.com/2018/english/SolidWorks/sldworks/t_Path_Mate_SWassy.htm https://help....


3

So, this is actually non-trivial. Here are the key points: In order to use the "Combine" feature, to create the volume that you want, you need to have a multibody part In order to move the parts dynamically inside a multibody, you need to use mates with the "move/copy bodies" feature. It cannot accept a global variable for translate/...


3

Ok, looking at the "Filleted" file, it looks like you are trying to achieve the following: Yellow = 1mm Orange = 2.3mm Red = 5mm Your issue is primarily with order of operations. You need to do the yellow fillet first, in order to avoid the "sharp point where the two fillets meet" which you mentioned in your comment. The file that you ...


2

Almost any 3D CAD programs can make movies. How detailed you want the movies, various textures (i.e. "shiny metal"), etc... is where the devil resides. As long as your software will render the material properly to your satisfaction, and you are proficient in the software, it should make a movie and you should use it.


2

CircuitWorks doesn't simulate the electronics; it just integrates between some common PCB design software formats and SolidWorks for mechanical information. For example, maximum component height, location of heat sinks and mounting holes, keep-out areas, etc. It sounds like what you want is a plug-in that drives the mechanical constraints in SolidWorks (...


2

You probably need some auxiliary sections as well as the three basic views. For example if you draw a section at mid-height looking down the axis, you can easily dimension the "straight" ribs. If you draw a section normal to one of the curved ribs, you can dimension the cross section of that rib, and presumably they are all the same. Since the dimensions ...


2

First of all, the comparison you suggest isn't really valid since SolidWorks is really a parametric solid modeling software package, while The Autodesk Suite encompasses several different software packages, one of which, Inventor, is roughly the functional equivalent to Solidworks. In an attept to answser your questions: The surface modelling functions ...


2

I'd recommend using a 3D Sketch Spline for creating your hose - this will more accurately model the natural shape that the hose would assume given the boundary conditions of perpendicular to the grey transparent block at the in/out positions. Let me know if you have any questions regarding this method:


2

In gear design, the most used tooth profile is the involute profile. I am not sure what do you mean by avoiding slipping(Velocity of sliding) because for two gears to move, there will definitely be slip as they have to maintain the contact while they transmit motion(except at the pitch point). Since you are using a 3D printer, please use the cycloidal ...


2

You can use the "Projected View" button to add another view, by selecting an existing view. You should bear in mind, however, that you should avoid adding unnecessary views if you can fully define the geometry of the object with only a few. I can't comment on this without an image of your object, however.


2

See the .gif below showing how you might set these mates up. You need to add another part or a sketch into your assembly with axes in the correct places, and then mate your shafts to be concentric to those axes. Here I have set the parts coincident to the front plane to also limit their axial movement.


2

The problem is that the CSV export is including the new line characters that are part of the hole callout. So this: A1,2.07,9.78,<MOD-DIAM> .257 THRU 5/16-18 UNC THRU should really look like this: A1,2.07,9.78,<MOD-DIAM> .257 THRU 5/16-18 UNC THRU You can perform a string replace of any pair or new line characters with some delimiter of ...


2

I've pretty much answered this in the comments, but didn't want to hyperlink an image: Make your loft into an un-merged solid, that can be used as a cut tool later. Pattern bodies instead of features, this is always more reliable Another thing to note - you can use the helix feature directly as your path, there's no need for a 3D sketch.


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