5

There are many possible culprits. One of them is the following. Check in the lower right corner of your Solidworks window. you should see if you click on it, you should see the following menu. You might have pressed it accidentally.


4

Yes. You need to use the "Auxilliary View" tool, but, this is only able to accept an 'edge' as an input, so you can't use a plane. Usually, one would use this to create a 'view looking at a face', but in your case, there is no such face, and so no edge in the drawing view to select. The workaround for this is to create a sketch entity, set ...


3

So, this is actually non-trivial. Here are the key points: In order to use the "Combine" feature, to create the volume that you want, you need to have a multibody part In order to move the parts dynamically inside a multibody, you need to use mates with the "move/copy bodies" feature. It cannot accept a global variable for translate/...


3

Ok, looking at the "Filleted" file, it looks like you are trying to achieve the following: Yellow = 1mm Orange = 2.3mm Red = 5mm Your issue is primarily with order of operations. You need to do the yellow fillet first, in order to avoid the "sharp point where the two fillets meet" which you mentioned in your comment. The file that you ...


3

Have a look at some of the advanced mates. For example limit mates : https://help.solidworks.com/2018/english/SolidWorks/sldworks/t_Limit_Mates_SWassy.htm I reckon that'll do what you need. Or you can get even fancier by defining a mate along a path. Good luck : https://help.solidworks.com/2018/english/SolidWorks/sldworks/t_Path_Mate_SWassy.htm https://help....


3

"Why" - This is not 'uncertainty' - it is displaying a tolerance. As far as the software is concerned, your part is exactly 14.40mm. The feature that you are using, however, is not used to communicate to the software how large the part should be (that will be the sketch that defined your body), but rather it's used to communicate to a human how ...


2

There are many, many, many different ways to constrain this sketch. You haven't given any details on your actual design intent, however. Looking at your screenshots, and your comment to NMech, I have assumed that you wish the rectangles to be as wide as the circle itself. In your headline question, you dimensioned this manually (rather than with an equation ...


2

There's no difference at all - an extrude is an extrude is an extrude (unless it's a cut) SolidWorks differs from some other CAD in that Boss and Cut are separate tools - others have just one extrude tool with a Boolean toggle in the feature manager You can (and should for your own sanity) rename features in the tree to better represent what they are to you. ...


2

Probably Jonathan R Swift will give the best reply, however I'll give it a try. It can be done in many ways. Assembly level In the assembly you have an option under Linear component Pattern. Part level - 1 If the distance is fixed and the orientation You can create another body within the same part. (This is something people sometimes forget) Then you can ...


2

There's a couple of ways to do this - I've illustrated both @StainlessSteelRat's Plane Cut method, and @NMech's Cut/Extrude method. Both are valid, and as always with these questions - there's not enough context to recommend which of these two, or the numerous other potential methods is best for your situation.


2

See below - I don't know what about convert entities is not working for you - it's fine for this application. It's worth noting, that this kind of referencing to edges is not typically recommended - better to make both the main body and the raised edges from a single master sketch - but there's not enough information in your question to recommend a better ...


2

No - there needs to be a physical plane or face to select for the mirror to be defined. You can define the reference plane to be the mid-plane between two opposing faces, or to be on a central axis etc. such that the position of the mirror plane dynamically updates if/when the geometry changes.


2

Let's look at your bonus questions first: No. Intellectual property isn't relevant, and STLs are definitely "editable" - I use Meshmixer to edit them directly. It is meant to make a file safe to open on pretty much any device with predictable results, similar to a PDF. STL's store the vertices. SOLIDWORKS creates models using what's known as &...


2

OK. So, there's actually a few problems. Per my comment, you selected the wrong material, which has the wrong density. I quickly modelled the part myself so I could do a part compare to see how your geometry differed. The "Red bit" is your part sticking out of the correct geometry. You can see that the position of the top isn't in the correct ...


1

I tend to use SolidWorks assembly to trial and error these types of assemblies, then worry about how to make it work. Constrain (Angle and Distance) the crap put of components to start and remove them as components are interconnected. Following the process I outlines in the comments: Platform: 100mm. Upper Arm: 105mm by 50mm, Angle 90°. The dimensions you ...


1

Yes. This has been a feature since 2019 http://help.solidworks.com/2019/english/solidworks/sldworks/c_3d_textures.htm The only 'downside' is that the output is a mesh body not BREP, but this isn't an issue in its intended use case of 3D print files. For rendering you would just bump map the smooth surface.


1

I think the words you're looking for are unfolding/unwrapping. There are a lot of software that can do this, which is more suitable depends on your application. Here is a good starting point :-) https://www.instructables.com/Design-Papercrafts-with-CAD-software/


1

First thing that popped in my mind was Pepakura


1

It works the same way as VBA - just add an apostrophe, so, for example: "Length" = 5mm 'Comment This will then be visible in the "Comments" column within the Equation Manager, too.


1

This ended up being a small problem in Illustrator due to my usage of the Image Trace module. The end product of the module creates two separate paths that are joined as one, so although Illustrator doesn't identify it, it still results in 2 paths when exported into DWG. The workaround for this is to make sure to exclude all paths except for the ones ...


1

I have a partial solution for this. By doing two opposing patterns of sketch blocks, rotated by 180 degrees to each other, and dimensioning the other sketch entities to fit around these, I can make a sketch which will update as you desire, including the more complex geometry, but unfortunately when you do an extrude, it creates disjoint bodies. This is ...


1

Open the grey part for editing. Use insert part, to add the yellow part, making this a multibody Use move/copy bodies to make a copy of the grey part in the same place Merge the grey and one of the yellow parts using combine tool Apply fillet Subtract the yellow part using combine tool, with the copied body as a subtract source.


1

Try using the following equations X(t) = 2* t* cos(3*t) y(t) = 2* t* sin(3*t) z(t)= 4 *t You can change the parameters in the above equations. More specifically Changing the: 2s and the 3s in the first two will change the rate that the circle of the helix grows 4 will change the spacing of the helix


1

Use a thin cut extrude, instead of the "Split" tool. Set this to be midplane, and add the total tolerance gap that you require depending on your printer, and how loose you want the puzzle pieces to be.


1

Me: What plane is the projection onto? Is it parallel to the plane being projected? You: It is not parallel, the face I am projecting onto is at an angle from the plane being projected. Could this be the issue? From Wikipedia: Orthographic projection is a means of representing three-dimensional objects in two dimensions. It is a form of parallel ...


1

See below - expand the side bar and the solid bodies folder, to then individually hide solid bodies. You can use the same side bar to quickly toggle visiblity of Sketches, Planes, Axes etc., too


1

You can convert it from a graphic body to a mesh body (use the command search at the top right of the screen), and then you can use the Boolean tools to affect it using other mesh bodies. You will not be able to "sketch on the face", since by their very definition, mesh bodies are made up of vertices, not faces. Native solidworks objects (BREP) are ...


1

Yes Right click in the drawing area, and then click "Edit Sheet Format", to allow you to select the lines you want to adjust Open the Lines Toolbar - you can search for it if you don't have it visible Change the line weight using the relevant tool See the .gif below to show this process.


1

Yes, it's possible. This is known as a hardware stack, and the official SW help pages provides a clear explanation regarding setting these up: https://help.solidworks.com/2019/english/SolidWorks/sldworks/c_Smart_Fasteners_Hardware_Stacks.htm#voc1450446632618


1

Update: To get the outer side of the cylinder, (expanding on Johathan R Swift's aswer) I would: create a plane where you want the rectangle to be. Start a sketch on that plane Use Convert entities to the inner edges of the circular bit. use those Converted Entities as guides to create a center construction line, between the edges. use the construction line ...


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