6

This is information to be shown on the printed copy - it is telling the reader to please not print this A1 drawing sheet on A4 paper, or else the information you have highlighted "Scale 1:8" would not be true any more.


6

Here is an attempt at going for the least amount of faces.


6

In structural construction, if it doesn't matter, it is left up to the contractor to put the bolts in however makes it easier for them. If it matters for some reason (clearance, aesthetics, etc.) then there should be a note. Drawing a bolt head on the drawing and making it clear that it is not a nut and will be noticed by the contractor is hard. It is easier ...


6

50 and 22 refer to diameters of the conical bit. Usually in axisymmetric objects you denote diameters. It is the same as the 36 and 45 diameters (which are more easily understood). So it is: $$\sqrt{\left(\frac{50-22}{2}\right)^2 +14^2}$$ $$\sqrt{\left(14\right)^2 +14^2}$$ So there is no contradiction. Regarding the 15, it actually refers to the distance ...


5

I have made a 3D model of my best guess for this model from your drawing. I've then generated a crib-sheet for the computer generated standard views (first angle projection, as per your sketch), and for some section views. Hopefully one of these provides the information that you're after? - have a look below, and let me know if you have any questions!


5

They are just identifiers for different types of holes. If the same symbol was used for every hole then every hole would need the size specified beside it if there was more than one type. With identifiers they just have to list the legend:


4

This is more of a long comment than an answer as i can not advice any specific software. First, if you intend to do anything professional in print or web productions than yous shouldn't be looking in direction of Microsoft for anything. Much abused does not mean any good. First tier would be to use direct vector drawing apps. In this category you have: ...


4

Knurling affects the roughness of a surface, but does not affect its diameter much. No material is removed, so for every indentation, a ridge is formed. This has the effect of making the measured diameter using calipers, for example, slightly larger*. If the knurled diameter is an inspection dimension, then you may wish to place a note on the drawing, after ...


4

H2 refers to the tolerance of the hole - whether it’s an upper or lower case letter shows if it’s a hole or shaft tolerance. In this case, as you mention it’s on a hole, I would expect it to be “H6”, which means for an 6.00mm hole, it would be acceptable if manufactured in the range 6.00-6.03mm in diameter.


4

SVG and images in general define a coordinate system with positive x towards the right positive y towards the bottom I.e. the pixels with coordinate y=1 are near the top. On the other hand dwg, defines a coordinate system with positive x towards the right positive y upwards All you need to do is flip your svg along the x axis, either on the original or ...


4

Measure 12.7 from both edges and the intersection gives the radius centre.


4

The "C5" annotation in this example refers to a "5mm Champher". It's important to note, however, that this is non-standard notation. I have included an example below with the standard annotation for the champher on the LHS, and another alternative on the RHS.


4

I think you need to understand what a "tolerance" means in an assembly items. My token view is, a tolerance is the permissible deviation of a part from its ideal design dimension. Additionally, under the non-ideal situation, the assembly will not lose its intended functionality, and desired level of performance. After that, you may start to tighten ...


4

Yes, it would be easier to drill the hole but there are other reasons. It's makes the shaft the same width as the red bearing also clamped by the green sides. The shaft will experience torque when the knob at the top is tightened. A hole though a round shaft would have high pressure on the curved edge at a point on each side some little distance away from ...


4

This is just a stiffener that goes around the cylinder that runs across the walls Section View FUll isometric view


3

4 x means it applies to the four instances that look similar on the drawing. Ø 5 means the hole diameter (drill size) is 5mm. “Thru all” is added here to remove the requirement for a section view to show hole depth. You can’t tell by the outlines whether it’s through, or you can see the bottom of the hole M6x1.0 - 6H is the thread and tolerance to be ...


3

I would go with Pitch of 0.35mm ie 1 turn advances by 0.35mm A view of the drawing may clarify this.


3

When you have an object to draw, you must follow some simple rules to explain your drawing for anyone to understand it easily. There are 2 example explanatory pictures below. Example 1 Example 2 Hope these helps!


3

Bottom or left based on what datum? It matters not, really. The end of the shaft visible in the photo is your mounting area. The drawing shows two sets of mounting bolt options. The inner circle formed by the holes in the first ring appear to be (surprisingly) SAE threads, 5/16" x 18 threads per inch, 10 mm deep. The second ring of bolt holes are showing as ...


3

It says the flats shall be within 0.100 units of radial dimension positioned with reference to 'A'. i.e. if you were to make the rim which is a perfect circle, then mill the flats at the three positions, what you should see is that the flats are exactly the same sectional shape and size if the machinist was perfectly precise. Some minor deviation from ...


3

I believe this is a related mating envelope related to datum A for the three plates, per ASME Y14.5-2009.


3

Like promised, I am now looking at EN ISO 14405-1:2016 where this E symbol (Ⓔ) is defined. More accurately is defined in section "3.8 envelope requirement". The upper value of a external feature defines a virtual cylinder that the entire feature has to fit inside. Likewise a internal features minimum value defines a cylinder that has to fit inside the hole....


3

This is a question of "my left or your left". Imagine standing and facing somebody, as if looking in a mirror. Now imagine the person in front of you saying "look left". Which way should you turn your head? it is their left, or your left? The choice you make affects what "left" means. Unlike a human, an object does not have it's own point of view, ...


3

There are general tolerances, often defined for different industries. You cannot expect that a surgical instrument is designed with the same general tolerances as a drilling rig. If you have found a norm for your industry, e.g. this ISO-standard, than there are still different classes of "tightness" you can choose from. Here should just check what ...


3

If the request is coming from whoever will be machining or inspecting the part, I would side with them. They know what they need to see to make sure the part ultimately meets the print. Also, since your first datum is on the opposing face this implies it is getting machined first, hence why it is a reference datum. The geometry of the face you're making the ...


3

From Tip #16 — What is the condition of your diamonds? Example d), as I’m sure you can easily figure out, is a heater. With all other things being equal, this one shows the inward arrows adding thermal energy to the hydraulic oil. I have left out the coolant flow arrows, which is common, meaning the coolant circuit isn’t specified. Symbol is clearly a ...


3

1/16" refers to the thickness of the circle containing the letters, which appears to be 4 3/8" diameter. 1/8" refers to the radius of the cylinder top under the lettered circle. If your question refers to the " notation, Pete W's comment addresses that aspect. " is inches Imperial measurement.


3

Figure 1. The cylinder is 24 mm diameter with an outer thread of M24 x 2 (pitch) extending to 16 mm from the end. And what is the diameter of the rotor? Is it 40? if yes then why they didn't put any diamater mark next to the number 40? Yes, 40 mm. It should be marked with a Ø symbol or "DIA". And I cannot find out the angle of the central key ...


3

My interpretation is the following (the dimensions are not exactly accurate).


3

Slashes are accepted in the iso/ansi standards as alternative to arrows which are preferred. They have a few advantages over arrows, especially in hand drawn documents. I see these quite often in architects sketches, and furniture designers plans (who seem to prefer these even in digital drawings). If I'm drawing dimensioned things on a whiteboard im about ...


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