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What would happen if I tempered aluminum of aeronautical use? Being more specific, an alloy of 96% of aluminum and 4% of copper, without modifications and 2% of impurities. (Al 2024)

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  • $\begingroup$ Is your aluminum already tempered? Are you re-tempering 2024-T[X]? Are you starting with 2024-0? $\endgroup$ – hazzey Nov 11 '15 at 1:46
  • $\begingroup$ I'm re-tempering 2024-T4, 2024-T6 and starting with 2024-0. $\endgroup$ – Oscar Espinosa Nov 11 '15 at 2:10
  • $\begingroup$ Does that mean that you don't know the temper of the original metal? or that it could be any of the typical tempers? $\endgroup$ – hazzey Nov 11 '15 at 2:38
  • $\begingroup$ I dont understand your question, maybe I write wrong what I want to said. In Mexico we call "Temple", "templar" o "templado"to the process in which you apply a heat-treatment to the material, you raise up the temperature just lightly above the criticó upper, then you cooled the material quickly. I hope that temple is equal to tempered. $\endgroup$ – Oscar Espinosa Nov 11 '15 at 2:47
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, those seem to be the same terms. It is still unclear what you are trying to do and why. $\endgroup$ – hazzey Nov 11 '15 at 13:31
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2024 is precipitation hardened, meaning it is first solution treated to remove any precipitates already present and then quenched to stop more forming during cooling. Afterwards it is aged to reform the precipitates in a controlled manner.

As the solution treatment effectively gives you a fresh start repeating the whole cycle will give you the correct temper. But you will get some grain growth every time you do the solution treatment, which normally reduces the tensile strength slightly (not sure how much with 2024).

If you were thinking of just doing the aging stage (similar to tempering hardened steels), then the precipitates will already be present and it won't have much of an effect.

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If it is not in the solution annealed condition , aging ( I guess that is what you mean by tempering) will do about nothing. If is in "as rolled" condition it may have cooled quickly enough to be partly solution annealed; then it may harden slightly during aging.

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