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I'm looking through this catalog at the motorized rotary tables and it says on page 114 that the maximum input shaft torque is 150 oz-in.The rotary table doesn't have a shaft so I'm confused as to how I should interpret this. Does it just mean that the maximum torque exerted by the motor is 150 oz-in or is there something else I need to be considering?

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  • $\begingroup$ so it does not have a shaft in the classic sense - the motor can still produce torque... $\endgroup$
    – Solar Mike
    Jul 2 '18 at 21:15
  • $\begingroup$ A rotary table obviously rotates, and does so around a certain axis, which you can consider a shaft.The torque there is presumable what they're talking about, but maybe there's a gearing between table and motor, in which case the motors torque may differ from that at the table, likely lower, so it has to rotate faster. $\endgroup$
    – Bart
    Jul 2 '18 at 21:42
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Seems like the maximum allowable input torque to the rotary table is 150 oz-in. From the catalog description, tables come standard with hollow shafts and mounting for NEMA 23 stepper motors. Pretty much, make sure the motor you install does not exceed the torque and RPM specs allowed by the rotary table.

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This is a complex and apparently mill spec piece of machinery. I would recommend you check with manufacturer. But as a first guess it says its out-put torque and speed are those limits. Now if in the previous sections it has defined other restrictions on configuration and placement of the load or its geometry, it has to be checked.

Usually they set up a short course with appropriate checklists for the operators of these type of machinery. You'd want to look into it.

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