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27

See this article: Digital History: The Rise of Hollywood and the Arrival of Sound. It refers repeatedly to "movie houses", and uses the term "wired for sound". these are certainly what the Variety extract is referring to. Note: I've also seen it hyphenated "movie-house", and contracted "moviehouse".


23

The most prosaic reason why your cable doesn't work and is drawing too much current is that you connected he wrong pairs of pins and/or some of the the wires are shorted together. If that is not the case, there are two obvious problems: A USB cable that meets the specifications has two twisted pairs of connectors enclosed in an outer shield, not four wires ...


22

Even aside from the fact that no outer sheath and no shielding makes me cringe, there are a couple of big issues with your custom cable: The data lines (pins 2 and 3) need to be a twisted pair. Period. USB uses differential signaling, and at the frequencies involved, the signaling lines need to be a twisted pair so that they actually behave correctly. The ...


13

they mean wired for sound. Previously movies were accompanied by a pianist or organ player.


4

For the USB signal, you have to make a 90 Ohm characteristic impedance twisted pair. The characteristic impedance depends on the insulator and on the outer/core diameter ratio of the wires. Search online calculators on the net. A simple way to twist wires: connect the two wires making a long wire twist the wire using an electrical drill put the wires ...


3

The device is likely not getting the power it needs. Use a thicker wire to ensure the resistance is the same as the original. Don't make an induction coil with your cable. It also helps to use twisted pair - see some of the faster ethernet cables for reference. You twist the two ends of a corresponding signal to preserve integrity. Since an approximately ...


3

Sorry, but the answer is "don't." When you use cables greater than (or even close to) the max rated length for a given comms protocol, you are asking for glitches and failures to occur. Get the right cable for the job.


2

For whatever reason standards bodies seem to prefer to give a tabulated list of values without giving any rationale to how those figures were obtained. I once tried to do some first-principles reasoning on this. Let $S$ be the surface area per unit length of the cable, $R$ be the resistance per unit length of the cable, $P$ be the power that can be safely ...


2

There are tables by various standards authorities which give current ratings for various wire gauges based on their insulation, bundling, free-air, conduit, etc. If you find one of those and plot the data you can generate your own best-fit curve. You might be able to get it down to a quadratic equation for a certain range of wire sizes.


2

For microscopic electrical probe pins, gold-plated tungsten is used because its stiffness modulus is large- which provides best resistance against buckling under compressive stress.


1

As mentioned, there is no "proper" way (proper is to keep cables short - shorter cables are generally cheaper too!). You can however do a careful bundle that looks like the 8 or infinity symbol. However rather than a simple repeat of the 8 loop, you should make each loop in the stack run in the opposite direction of the previous. The 8 shape is ...


1

if you cut the drum longitudinally into two half-cylinders you will have 10 cut ropes with a tension of 200kN. Let's say the center to center distance of each rope is L inches (moderately small WRT. to the radius) then you have to calculate the area of the section of the barrel between the ropes and a thickness,t, and a safety factor of 1.6 $$1.6*200kN/(L*t)&...


1

Those fibers are also commonly used to color-code the wires so you will not confuse them when you strip off the insulation, and wire up your device backwards.


1

The fibre is usually the first part of the cable making process, as it forms the support for adding further components as the thin signal cables need the fibre support.


1

My question was based on an appearance that the thin winding wire seemed to violate the laws of physics, so there might be some other factors at play. Neil_UK answers this in generator coils: max power given wire gauge on the Electrical Engineering site. The bottom line is no. It's mainly a matter of using multiple coils in parallel to manage the current ...


1

Note: Small Gauge mean the wire can carry a significant amount of current. Example per the attach AWG 4-5 can carry 100A. There are lot other factors need to be considered before selecting a wire. Below is guide line help you appreciate wire gauge vs current. This is purely a guideline. I suggest searching American Wire Gauge Charts vs Electrical Current ...


1

Introduction Thermocouple Wire that is used in a thermocouple from the point of sensing to the point of cold junction compensation (cjc end) where the signal is measured. A thermocouple is a sensor for measuring temperature, that consists of two dissimilar metals that are joined together at the sensing end. Different thermocouple types (e. G. J, K, T, E, etc)...


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