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7

I haven't done a complete check of your calculations but I do have two comments: You describe the thickness as 10mm yet use 100mm in the calculation of the section modulus, resulting in a capacity 100 times too great. As Chuck has noted in a comment, you haven't accounted for the shear stresses. (With an elastic stress distribution, it is possible this won'...


7

The welds on welded wire mesh are for more than just holding the wires together while handling. There are specific weld strength requirements for welded wire. The design of welded wire reinforcing uses the number of cross wires to determine development length. This is the reason why a weld strength is required. You can't have the welds breaking while force ...


6

I'm not aware of BC as standard English nomenclature for welding, but I have a guess for what they mean. The fact that there is a period after the B but not the C makes me wonder if something was cut off or whited out in the original. I think they mean backgouge (BG) which would be a common process in a double sided vee groove weld it it needed to be a ...


6

Summary: 1) The answer to this question is difficult. You would need to know how austenite and ferrite behave in relation to what you are doing to them. You would also need to know their compositions, temperature field, etc. The results here could vary significantly depending on the specific parameters and how they change with time and with each other. 2) ...


6

What chapter/section of AISC codifies this kind of problem? If you're looking for a specific code provision for this exact type of weld, you're out of luck. However, it is possible to solve this problem using basic mechanics of materials principles. For this case, I'm going to use elastic design. You could also use the instantaneous center of rotation (...


4

How does one decide whether the fillet weld connecting the strut to the waler need to be designed against compression due to possibility of such a small gap? In our office, we generally design welds to take compression load due to the exact reason you're specifying. Unless you can ascertain that you have full bearing between the two pieces (i.e., both ...


2

I've spent some time working out the geometry for this configuration and believe I've developed a set of cases that will work to determine the total effective throat of this connection. The solution is divided into three cases. Case 1 - Undersized Fillet Weld $(L_2 < RO)$ For this case, the fillet weld is sized such that the vertical leg is less than ...


2

Yes, you can plug a higher rated load into a lower rated breaker if the load is monitored to minimize trips. If you are using a different plug, make sure that the other plug is removed entirely there are no exposed wires or contacts. I assume you are in europe and the standard wall voltage is indeed 220V (If someone in the US is reading this in the future, a ...


2

Assuming you're talking about plates: it would depend on you code, but usually it's the angle between the two joints that matters. If you mean a 90 degree joint with two 45 degree miter angles, I would still treat it as a corner joint. If there is a 10 degree miter angle on each piece so the dihedral angle in the joint is 160 degrees, it would be considered ...


1

In order to have an internal surface of sufficient surface finish for a piston to seal properly, the cylinder must be internally machined. Properly, it should be bored and honed. To speed up the process, it may be reamed and polished or perhaps burnished, depending on the sealing/pressure required, that may not be sufficient enough.


1

Both processes require the base material temperature to reach welding temperature. Arc welding does this using an electric arc, and the process is quite fast. Also, the deposition of the filler material is fast. This is important because the heat affected zone is smaller. The heat affected zone is the region when a phase change in the parent material ...


1

With a few assumptions : Dimensions indicate pressure below where serious codes like ( USA) ASME section 8, div, 1 would apply. Although "lethal" materials would change that. You could still look at any available code to see what those requirements are. In particular weld reinforcement/ thickness. No code = no NDE , but assuming steel, It wouldn't be too ...


1

All code considerations aside, at high pressures the stress distributions in this nozzle configuration demand significant reinforcement and superior welding. The vessel begins to act less like a solid shell and more like a loosely held together curved beam. It is not uncommon for the reinforcement pad to extend out so far that the nozzle + pad take up half ...


1

The welding codes and standards will apply relevant to your country / location / insurance specifications no matter what angle the nozzle is welded at.


1

I would agree with your assumption on the weld types. That being said, you could probably just specify a V-groove weld all the way around the joint like this(where xx is the size of the weld) If necessary, you can provide as many details as you need into the callout: Alternatively, you could something like this: Lastly, you could just use 4 separate weld ...


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