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4

I expect it works the same as a wrist watch type ; There is a weighted wheel , that is one side is substantially heavier than the other side . When the watch is moved , the heavy side of the wheel rotates so it is on the bottom. By using a ratchet , this rotation winds the main spring when rotation is in the correct direction . In the opposite direction the ...


3

You advance the date manually, if required. It can be done without disturbing the time setting. Figure 1. Image source: Watches under 500. Position I – for hand-winding of the main spring. Position II – position of the crown in which you will able to change the day and date. If your watch only has a date window, you can change the date by turning the crown ...


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First of all, this is very much depended upon the implementation. Having said that, the chances that damage occurs during self winding are minimal. It would take a pretty bad design to do that, and usually the people that still make watches are very experienced and with attention to detail. So the only case that you might actually "hurt" the ...


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It disengages the winding wheels and eventually stops the movement after the energy stored in the spring has exhausted.


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Pretty sure they are not all stainless steel. I would expect some brass and I don't think I would expect the springs to be stainless steel. Different metals with water result in galvanic corrosion. And stainless steel can still rust. Also, water leaves behind residues and junk. And water provides resistance to the gears and mechanical oscillators so it would ...


1

Every mechanical system will wear out. What you will find is that over time your mechanical watch will become more and more inaccurate until it stops working altogether. No, it doesn't have to be maintained every two years, but it likely won't last a decade without needing service.


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No and no. The watch is only waterproof as long water deosn't get inside. Water can cause corrosion and leave up residue. Especially since it's unlikely the water that will get inside will be pure. It will contain minerals and might be slightly acidic. Besides, pocket watch is very delicate mechanism. When the water rushes inside, especially under pressure (...


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I got my first wrist watch nearly 50 years ago. It was fully mechanical, spring powered, no batteries, & needed to be wound every day. My second watch, obtained a few years later, was also fully mechanical, but automatic - meaning it had a rotating weight/pendulum that moved every time the wrist moved and it wound the spring. About 40 years ago I bought ...


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