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It really depends on the problem and what you want to capture. Usually, in classes, it may be beneficial for the students at an initial stage to disregard gravity alltogether in order to simplify the equations of motion. Below are a few scenarios, starting from the most trivial. Horizontal Case In the following mass spring system: There is no point in ...


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Most acoustic vibrations of air more or less confined to a given geometry can be explained by two basic models. One is the one-dimensional treatment of the air in a tube, and the other is the lumped-parameter treatment of the air within a volume that has a small hole in its side. The former is called a quarter-wave or half-wave tube, depending on the nature ...


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The frequency of the sound you're hearing is related to the changing resonant frequency of your bottle based on the frequency/velocity relationship of sound waves v=f*λ Velocity (v) is the speed of sound in air which is nearly constant, typically 343 m/s. The length of the air column in your bottle is the wavelength (λ) of the resonant frequency. So as the ...


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Let's consider a mass and spring system in a frictionless open channel attached at one end to the channel. so that we can position the channel vertically or horizontally. If we position the channel vertically it will initially deflect by the amount $Y_{initial}= \frac{mg}{k} $ due to gravity. But the gravity is not changing so it can not affect the vibration....


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