10

Oddly enough, this problem can be fixed using a set of car keys and your wallet. Here are the steps to follow: 1) put the keys in the ignition of your car, start it, and drive to the motorcycle scrapyard. 2) once there, exchange several pieces of local currency for a gear pulled out of another identical motorcycle. 3) place the gear in your pocket and ...


5

As suggested by the comments, there are a couple of missing factors in this animation. The first is there is no clutch being shown. A typical transmission involves a means of disengaging the power to the transmission. The other factor that is missing is that the parts are rotating (other than from a standing start). The parts being coupled are rotating at ...


4

That's because when you upshift, you select a lower ratio, so your clutch speed drops. Since you took your foot of the gas, the engine rpm also dropped, and now the clutch and engine speed are close to synced, and hence little force is felt when you engage the clutch. The best way to upshift is to relieve the throttle a little(not fully), so the rpm will ...


3

Tight or loose belts is one possibility, used on shaft drive to drills and lathes for years. Or consider the electromechanical clutch used on cars now to drive the ac compressors.


3

Clutches do indeed carry quite lot of force but when you pull away from stationary the correct technique is to use fairly low revs and blend the clutch in quickly but smoothly. In this case the clutch is only slipping for a second or so and the torque involved is fairly small. If you are more aggressive or slip the clutch for long periods you can indeed wear ...


3

It depends on what type of differential it has. The nature of an open differential (as found on normal road cars) is that the spinning wheel(s) will get all of the torque. Proper off-road vehicles will usually have a diff-lock selector which works on some of all of the differentials which means that both driveshafts the diff is connected to get the same ...


2

Detent clutches use mechanical interference to force the halves of the clutch into hard engagement. The wear surfaces in this case are metal-on-metal which works well when the engagement duty cycle is low, as for example in the overrunning-clutch mechanism used in motorcycle starters. However, for purposes of shifting gear ratios in a car transmission, you ...


2

To turn your gear from rest, you'll need to overcome the inertia of your entire system (rod and gear). Torque = inertia x angular acceleration. You'll need to figure out what angular (rotational) acceleration you need/can get from your motor. You can approximate inertia with I = (1/2) x mass x radius^2. You can approximate gears being 95% efficient if you'...


2

There is a solution for this and it's called planetary gearset. All Toyota hybrids (at least the traditional not-PHEV ones) have a planetary gearset that sums together the power produced by motor-generators and the internal combustion engine. With two motor-generators, it also allows infinitely finely adjustable CVT that is electrically adjusted. So, it ...


2

Your understanding is correct. Here is an alternate definition from Wikipedia - Bandwidth Bandwidth is the difference between the upper and lower frequencies in a continuous band of frequencies. It is typically measured in hertz, and depending on context, may specifically refer to passband bandwidth or baseband bandwidth. Alternate definition: The ...


2

Image from https://www.j-k-tuning.com/Transmission/BTrans2.php You can put them anywhere you want to (and people do). But it is easier to put them on big gears than little ones. If your four speed was working the other way around with the green as an output shaft, all the gears would have to have the inverse ratios, and you would have all your syncros on ...


2

You missed an important part: The clutch Your intuition is exactly right that the gears would quickly shred themselves if that was the only thing bringing them into synchronization. But if you hadn't noticed, your drawing accounts for only the shifter in the middle of the console. That drawing does not cover that pedal to the left of the brake - the one ...


1

Generically, one can consider this to be a transfer case. It's common in a four-wheel drive vehicle, although in such application, power is applied to rear only or front and rear. The concept is consistent, as a transfer case would provide the option to disengage power from one output and apply to the other. In the process of researching this question, I ...


1

A complicated solution would be an electromagnetic clutch; essentially a solenoid with a spring and a friction wheel. When it's powered, spring is compressed away from the friction wheel and desired pulley. Power is provided and the spring returns to it's unloaded position and engages friction wheel with the pulley. You would need a controller to manage ...


1

That is a simple animated drawing, getting a gearbox out of a recent car and stripping it would show you that most gearboxes rarely have dog clutches. They have synchromesh rings - usually a bronze based material that has a conical surface to match a cone machined on the steel gear - this works to match the gears to the same speed by friction as the gears ...


1

There are to problems with the question. Over 250 kilometers earth has 5 kilometers curve. the weight and tension in the cable are prohibiting to normal materials. W*125000/60 = approximate tension. Otherwise there are many references online to solve a catenary self weight cable length.


1

This just shows gears and synchromesh... no clutch operation at all. The clutch pressure plate moves some 5 millimetres or so but the pedal quite a bit more. The plate will slip until sufficient pressure is applied by the pressure plate. This is where the rapid damage is caused by those who “ride” the clutch ie use the clutch pedal as a footrest or slip the ...


1

The original automatics did not have torque converters ; they mostly had fluid couplings . Chrysler in particular , had more than a half dozen different ones in the various cars. They were more like "gear changers" with an automatic clutch ; some still included a clutch pedal. Performance was very poor by todays standards. And there were overdrives that ...


1

That is not why torque converters are used in automatic transmissions. They are used because in addition to declutching the engine from the transmission at idle, they furnish torque multiplication, in essence giving a 3-speed transmission a fourth "gear" that slips into and out of engagement without jerks and furnishes a smooth range of equivalent "gear ...


1

Your equation is correct for your definition of $d$. However, your definition of $d$ seems incorrect. $d$ is supposed to the be distance between the transmitter and the receiver, that is the distance on a straight line from the transmitter to the receiver. In your diagram you have (I think incorrectly) defined $d$ as the horizontal distance on some plane, ...


1

The seal you are looking for is commonly called an oil rotary seal ring. I found many brands and sizes with a quick search. the range of prices for a 1-inch shaft is around $5.


1

Usually because dog clutches are engaged when the shafts are stationary - lathes are a good example as they change speeds when the work is stationary and the tool dis-engaged.


1

The essential question here is why or why not use a transmission in an electric car. Here are the underlying issues. It is commonly asserted that a DC electric motor is a constant-torque device, developing the same torque at standstill (0 RPM) that it does at its rated RPM (in this case, 3000). Advocates of the "no-transmission" position cite this as a ...


1

Clutches in car transmissions are designed on purpose to allow slip transiently, to make gear changes and standing starts smooth. This is not a bad thing. But they are not designed to slip all the time, which would wear them out quickly and generate lots of heat. It is possible to use the synchronizers in a motorcycle transmission to "bang" through the ...


1

That was common over 100 years ago. A single steam engine, or water wheel , or electric motor was connected by flat leather belts to a series of drive shafts on the ceiling of the factory. Each machine was connected by belt to a pulley on the ceiling ; pulley diameters were selected so that each machine ran at an appropriate speed. Speeds could be changed ...


1

In order for a tooth on C to travel 100mm, the teeth on B also need to travel 100mm. Let's not worry about how many revolutions that is. A has 2.6 times as many teeth as B,and travels the same number of rotations, so, that means that a tooth on A must travel 260mm. The pitch of the worm is 4mm, so, it needs to rotate 260/4=65 times in order to cause the ...


1

Typical distance sensors depend on time-of-flight. If you're trying to hack the distance from return power level, you will not be happy (to put it mildly). It's next to impossible to calibrate any system that way. As to direction, it should be obvious that you cannot possibly do so with a single receiver. As a minimum you'd need two sensors aka two ...


1

To answer your questions: Yes, a lot of heat gets produced. Most of it will sink into the flywheel, but the clutch does get very hot. That's why it's good to keep the revs low when feathering the clutch. Don't pull away revving more than 1200rpm. Better to keep it at 1000, also with a petrol car. That may require some practice though. It's not hard at all ...


1

Only if the differential is limited slip. If there is no limited slip diff then the wheels with no traction will just spin wildly and no torque is transferred to the wheel with traction. Some off-road vehicles let you lock the diffs so that torque can be delivered to all wheels regardless of traction.


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