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9

100 cN.m are 1 N.m The c before the N.m is pronounced centi. It's a standard SI prefix. 1 c of a unit is $\frac{1}{100}$ of a unit. Therefore to convert toN.m you need to multiply cN.m with 0.01. $$0.01 \text{N.m} = 1 \text{cN.m} =1 \text{N.cm} $$ Probably the prefix centi is most commonly encounter used in centimeter cm. Regarding the uses of cN.m or ...


5

For a circle, yes. Such a tool exists: Digital Radius Caliper There are also Digital Radius Gauges, which may be useful for smaller curves. For a general curve, you can't measure the curvature exactly since it varies continuously along the curve. You could perhaps assume a region is approximately circular and measure that. But depending on the size of the ...


4

How about a Contour Gauge: And here: Wikipedia Article Make your measurement Trace it Scan/digititize it Analyze it (spline/curve fit) with some type of CAD software.


4

Probably a skilled metalworker will come along and lough at me for this, but I don't think you can cut to 0.1 mm accuracy with many hand tools. I see these ways: using a small saw (your tubes are fairly small) and then file down to the desired length. I think pliers or bolt cutters could cut through your tube, but will likely chinch it shut Or get a tube ...


4

A relatively inexpensive and quite useful device would be a "pocket optical comparator". They come with Several etched glass plates with features of size that you optically/visually compare to your part. I'm happy to explain more if need be. Furthermore, you can also use a two-part rapid set silicone mold material to take molded impressions of your ...


4

As a busy engineer, I would say you did your due diligence. There are always more variables than we are given time to consider. The higher the risk of failure/injury, the more time we spend on it, but there are limits. I often try to have another engineer or manager look at my work so there is another set of eyes on it. Also, taking time to test new tools/...


3

I would certainly hesitate to install a toothed blade on a saw designed for abrasive disks. My biggest concern would be that the dynamic loading is likely to be significantly different and as these things are dangerous enough to begin with it seems and unnecessary risk that some unforeseen set of circumstances could cause a catastrophic problem. If I were ...


3

The device you're looking for is called a vacuum regulator and sits between the vacuum source and the process. This page from Equilibar shows some examples and provides links that explain how they work. You can also use a vacuum breaker, which operates more or less like a pressure relief valve, but a vacuum regulator will offer more precise control. There ...


3

There is indeed a 3 dimensional analogue of the iron filings experiment and it is often referred to as 'ferrofluid', a google search for the term will yield lots of interesting videos. In essence it is small ferromagnetic particles suspended in some fluid with the right viscosity, again a search should yield plenty of homebrew recipes and it is certainly ...


3

Use a pillar drill and a rotating vice which has graduations on it. Drill a hole at 0 degrees then rotate for hole at 60 degrees. Repeat for other holes then join with saw cuts, dremel etc.


2

Generally a company is not going to recommend you do something outside the scope of the intended product design because that would invoke liability. There are lots of variables like blade mounting tolerances, bearing loading, shroud design, chip removal, intended cutting material, motor hp and rpm as you mentioned. And because of these variables, someone ...


2

The proper crimper will indent the cylindrical body of the contact, leaving the outside diameter unchanged. Pliers will simply squash the contact, making it oval, and larger than the original diameter in one direction. This may prevent the contact from seating correctly (or at all) in the connector housing. The distorted contact will probably make it ...


2

In machine shops, the purely mechanical types are called dial indicators. For ones that can be read electronically, the classic ones are called LVDT's or Linear Variable Displacement Transducers. There are many types of these in use today as what are called proximity sensors which measure gap widths or clearances without having to touch the object being ...


2

Micrometers tend to be used for higher precision measurements and are usually specific to one particular type of measurement (thickness, depth, bore etc) they are defined by their vernier screw mechanism which can be adapted to various functions (the fine feeds on lathes use a similar principal). Vernier calipers (and their dial and digital equivalents) ...


2

Generally an abrasive saw is a bench-top tool. It looks like a miter saw but has a grinding disc instead of a toothed blade. The dist will be on the order of 12-16 inches in diameter for a typical saw. Angle grinders are handheld tools with much smaller discs - usually between 4 and 8 inches in diameter. While there are come very large angle grinders and ...


2

In general they are not interchangable. But if they use the same speed and clamping method then they might be. Best to check with the manufacturer. Some discs are meant to be used only on the outside edge for cutting, whereas others might be used side on (say, 35 degrees) to grind. We have problems in the UK of untrained people using cutting blades for ...


2

Usually threads are done by some standard. You can use calipers to measure and than find closest in standard, if your product is from eu, its easy you need eu standards like this ISO 68-1:1998 or maybe BS pipe So the answer would be to measure as accurate as possible but also use literature. Mechanical engineering handbooks like Kraut are great to have at ...


2

The edge is sharp to make sure the side of the hole is left smooth minimizing the cutting marks and to make sure that the resulting diameter is correct. However, if a precise diameter is required then a reamer is usually used to finish the hole.


2

I'd consider this to be an identification question related to engineering, rather than a product recommendation question. A search using "scriber and depth gauge" presents a large number of inappropriate devices and a smaller number of what appear to be the right device: As one might note, this is not of the same scale, but appears to be an accurate match. ...


2

A glass or tile drill has a cutting edge designed for that hard material which comes off as a dust. A wood bit cuts more material faster so it has a fluting designed to remove that material. Purchase and use the correct one for the job otherwise they can overheat and fail needing replacement.


2

Another name you might find it is Hex bit adapter. or Hex Shank Socket Nut Driver Set Drill Bit Amazon has a nice set that you might like


2

They had jeweled points set into bronze tube drills. Artisans used generations of experience and secret grinding methods with a good knowledge of metallurgy. This is a related article old Egypt drilling methods "In 1996, this tube-drilled piece of granite was on display in the Cairo Museum"


2

A production line works because it is a line producing a product. There is no equivalent decomposition line. The equivalent would be a recycling system because it depends on breaking down individual products into components and reusing the components in new products. Products are different and require similarities to allow cost-efficient recycling. ...


2

The problem is you are missing a reference edge or hole to indicate anything off of, and you can't trust the edges of your rectangle plate. Maybe cut out the acrylic in an oversized circle (for backplate mounting holes), mount the acrylic on an aluminum back disc then rotate it in a lathe (even just turning the chuck by hand should work) chuck to see if the ...


2

Best option is to open the device and use a tool or paperclip to push the remains out. Does depend on having access though, or very fine tweezers but then you tend to be working blind... Whatever you try, remove the battery or disconnect power first and wait 30 minutes for caps to discharge.


2

Put a hex-head plug in each end so you have a flat.


1

You wrote that you know how microscopes work. Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) can manipulate things. Tunneling microscopes can "see" atom level. Imagine a sharp needle with only one atom at its pointy part (if you cut a tungsten filament with scissors, you probably got one, so it's not impossible to make one). If you move a needle like that over a surface (...


1

It's accurate to suggest that a drill press is not designed to handle lateral forces on the bearings and spindle. Contrary to that, you'll see plenty of posts to various locations made by people who have added a drum sander to their drill press. This is certainly a lateral load on the spindle. For a one-off task, it's likely that you would not cause ...


1

This is a layman's view, but based on some engineering principles of which I am aware. The tool steel as you describe would become a direct short. As such, the resistance isn't necessarily going to be high enough to make it red hot. There may be other components in the circuit (clamps, cable connections, cables, etc.) that would have higher resistance than ...


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