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The devil is in the detail. It depends on the relative stiffness of the rod versus that of the support. If Young's modulus of elasticity of the rod is just a bit smaller than the support the rod moment will deform the support as it also deforms by the reaction of the support. If the support material is much stiffer than the rod it will cause a concentration ...


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None of the three would occur if the material of the element holding the rod is "rigid", or is much stiffer than the rod. For such cases, my assessment is as shown below. For the case that the rod is much stiffer than the element holding it, the stress distribution is based on the flexibility of the rod. You can verify the result using a model ...


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First, I'd like to point out that your question seems a bit off - IMHO. In most FEA packages you'd set the boundary conditions (ie. how the nodes are allowed to translate/rotate and the forces) and then solve for the displacement/internal reactions. What I'm trying to say, is that your question would make sense, if you were trying to build a new solver for a ...


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Von Misses Stress is a distinct state of material measure at a certain location of an element. It is not a measure of stress variations between two points. The equations below demonstrate how to calculate the Von Misses Stress for an element under various states/types of stresses. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Von_Mises_yield_criterion#:~:text=Summary%20%20%...


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If you only have those two nodes for the whole beam then it won't be possible, even if external loads are not applied between the nodes. The reason is the bending moments that follow (usually) a non linear relationship with x, so you won't be able to accurately interpolate between the nodes. Interpolation if more node data are available If you had more ...


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From the structural engineering perspective, for geometry and compatibility concerns, an idealized beam end support MUST NOT have rotational freedom about the beam's longitudinal axis. Thus, a continuous beam is treated as consisted of multiple-single span fixed end beams for the concern of torsion.


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If your middle support does restrict rotation it will help diminish the torque on the second span. But even if the middle support does not restrict rotation the geometry of the beam will cause some overturning moment resistance hence absorbing some of the torque. Consider a continuous two-span beam W 12x136 beam with a depth of 13.41" and width of 12.4&...


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From the comments I am inferring that your question is about what is causing most of the bending moment. First of all an example. A 3MW wind generator has the following characteristics : hub height $h_h$: 70 m (between 60 and 84 m) rotor radius $r\approx 40 m$ Assuming a wind speed of $v=10$ [m/s], the nominal pressure of the wind on the tower is about: $$...


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When you push the concrete wall the following happens. your body starts to firm up from the major muscle groups around your back and waist core and gets ready for heavy lifting. Some muscles just tighten your waist and push the disks on your lower backbone tight together causing realignment on them. from there a complex hierarchy of neurons shoots orders ...


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It hasn't disappeared. You have made your hand a little warmer because your own tissue has deformed. Your hand will return to its original shape and the generated heat will be moved to the environment as radiation and by convection. If you tried too hard you could see and remember the consequences at least a while. The concrete generally happens to be much ...


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TL;DR: Yes, any structure deforms if you put a load on it. Even adding an ant on top of a granite mountain will change (lower) the height of the mountain - imperceptibly so but it will still change it. The problem is that its not possible to measure it. That is the whole idea behind Young's Modulus (modulus of elasticity). Essentially, all materials behave ...


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First of all, buckling is an instability failure mode. I.e. the structure resists up to a critical load, and beyond that the failure is very rapid. In most textbooks, buckling is considered in single column members. (Obviously, buckling can occur in structures like the one you have.) In an example with two columns (see below), if you had two columns with ...


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