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It quite simply means that when you are doing e.g. a check for the maximum X-force, you should use the Y-force and Z-force (and any bending moments and so on, if applicable) that occurs in the same load combination, and similarly for the other forces. Note that the procedure you describe, may sometimes be significantly on the unsafe side in with respect to ...


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Many of the solution techniques are only now used because we have computers. Trial and error was used - many buildings failed both during and after construction. Look at how churches had to have buttresses to keep the walls in place as they got bigger - did they have the maths to calculate those? Or even the theory? They did come up with empirical formulae - ...


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It is an incomplete and vague question. Needs the geometry and material properties of the table and the legs. Consider a thin big table. It will deflect so much under the load into a hyperboloid that it will let the legs' connection to rotate offsetting them from being vertical, making a wider base, causing the P delta effect, leading to collapse of the ...


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A hinge is a point where there is no restriction on rotation. For other points on a beam, the rotation to the left of a point must be equal to the rotation to the right of that same point; that is, there can't be a discontinuity in the rotations along a beam. Hinges, however, don't have this restriction and therefore allow for discontinuities of rotation. ...


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If yes then the does this mean bending moment about point B (the hinge) is zero. You should re-read your notes, or look up "hinge" in your book's index, and start reading up, starting with the first mention. How can the bending moment around a hinge be anything but zero? What happens if you have a hinge and it has bending moment? What does it do?...


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