New answers tagged

1

You made a mistake in solving the reaction at joint "A". See calc below: $\sum M_G = 0$ $R_A = \dfrac{22.31*8}{12} = 14.873$ kN Solve internal member force using the method of section: Since there is only one unknown in the vertical direction, so we can solve the member force $F_{BC}$ directly by $\sum F_X = 0$ $\sum F_X = 0$ $-F_{BC}cos 30^{o}$ +...


0

Whatever is causing this is a bug, either in your input, your your FE code, or your graphics display package. Since we don't have access to any of those, we can't help you find it. The only thing we can do is tell you that it shouldn't happen! UPDATE: Reading the OP's comments, there seem to be three problems here. The constraints are not consistent with ...


1

{I am going to assume you are applying a axial loading condition on the right end of the beam). That seems a singularity and formally, it should happen if you are constraining all the DOF's of all the nodes on the left boundary. But since as it appears that it is only occurring on the top left node and not on bottom left node, I am guessing there exists some ...


1

The invariants affect the shape of the yield surface. The von Mises condition assumes that the yield surface remains cylindrical in principal stress space. If you want pressure-dependence (the circular cylinder becomes a circular cone), then you add the first invariant into the mix. If the yield surface varies depending on whether you are in pure triaxial ...


3

Bearing stress is essentially the contact pressure between two surfaces (the bolt and the joint in this example). I find illuminating the following picture that shows the force flow. figure (source chegg) how it is transferred though one part of the joint to the bolt and then to the other part of the joint. The bearing stress in this bolt correspond to ...


0

This is an added effort in response to your question after your latest update. In the situation above, if a < d (beam depth), practically we can replace the uniform load with a concentrated load, and say it is justified by the Saint-Venant Principle. However, it will run into problems with the actual behaviors from the beam theory if we proceed to check ...


0

Roak's Formulas suggest using the beam equation with some modifications. It states: 11.4 Bimetallic Plates A very wide beam of rectangular cross section can be treated as a beam if E is replaced by $\dfrac {E}{1-\nu^2}$ and $I$ by $t^3/12$ (see Sec. 8.11). It can also be treated as a plate with two opposite edges free as shown in Figs. 8.16 and 11.2. For ...


1

I would like to add something to the already existing answer here. Yes, it would be considered as an application of Saint Venant's principle. Since the law just mentions about replacing a point force with an equivalent distributed force over the area and vice versa, it can be an externally applied force or it can be a reaction force, so it doesn't matter. ...


0

Yes it is correct. This is not a dire t answer but can shed some light on the question. We do a lot of simlar substitution of point load for distributed loads and vice versa. we do the same exchenge between point loads to one moment e g, in bolted hangar roof beam to column or bolted brackets supperting a beam. in the elbow bolt group we find the CG of the ...


3

Yes, I think you can say so if you reverse its concept exactly the way it is concerned. The explanation (of the concept) below is quite straightforward and precise: Saint-Venant's Principle simply states that the stress measured at any point on an axially loaded cross section is uniform given that the measured location is far enough away from the point of ...


4

Yes, it increases and decreases strength in traditionally steels. Depends on what steel you have and what you mean by "thin rods", and the weld process , and the specific weld parameters. Properly selected filler metal will be close to the base metal strength. Common stick electrodes are "60" which means the weld deposit will be over 60,...


4

Regarding the problem you have, without reviewing the results its difficult to make a definitive answer. However, if you are observing high loads near the weld, I think you should try to make geometric modifications, to decrease any stress concentrations or loads. The reason is that welds are generally very "temperamental". What I mean by that is ...


Top 50 recent answers are included