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Ferritic stainless ( 13 % Cr, 405, 409, etc) will be fine and cheaper than 304. Ferritic sheet metal was unusual decades ago, but uses in home appliances, auto exhaust, etc. has made sheet much more available. Actually if you could find an appliance junk yard, you could probable get a good deal on ferritic sheet. Some Korean appliances are 304 but most all ...


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It looks like a mock-up models for advertising purposes. Imagine placing one of these at the entrance of the bolt factory. hahaha


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If we were to deal with this as a post with just the weight of the instrument, and say we would estimate the bolts at 10 inch of center, we would have a moment of $$ M=20* (14+4)/2 lbs inch$$ and a pull up force on the bolts of $$180/10/2=9lbs \ each \ bolt$$ and we could multiply loading by 3 as a dynamic load factor and be done with it. But the vibration ...


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This is my suggested details for the post and the base plate with sufficient safety margins (for the static load as shown). I would weld all around the tube to the base plate ($F_y = 36 or 50 kai$). If you have significant torsion, please check the torsional stress against yield by the formula $\sigma_t = \dfrac{F_t*e}{J}$, in which $J = 4.28 in^4$ for the ...


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Ignoring the fuel source for the furnace (such as vanadium in fuel oils causing rapid oxidation); What do you want the answer to be? For minimum stress as I expect a roof to be , ferritic like 430 or 446 should be lower cost. Otherwise any of the "18-8" types like 304 (HF as a casting) would be good. I would avoid 316 , 317 because of possible ...


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Most grades of stainless steel can handle 850 degrees without problem. Even the cheap ones such as 304. Although at that temperature it will be glowing bright red. It will discolor and some degradation will occur over time. Especially if it is exposed to abrasive particulate exhaust, or if it's stressed due to thermal cycling. The solution for this is ...


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