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I 'll start with the one that you should DEFINITELY NOT use: $mm^3$ or $mm3$. Probably the most widely used is the 1st. It's compact and economical and these are two of the most deciding factors in Engineering thought and practice. To take the point one step further, if it's in an engineering drawing you don't even need to put units in. Unless, its ...


6

In an earlier comment, I suggested that an answer to "what is the correct way..." (as opposed to "What is the generally accepted way...") might be found in the ISO 80000-3 standard. I had a look, and there's nothing relevant in ISO 80000-3. Nor can I find any other ISO standard that explicitly states a correct way of doing this. ...


2

Go directly to the ASTM site. I put "nylon rope" in search and it said there were 154 possibilities.


2

1x2x3 mm is usual. You might specify individual units if they used different multiples. For example, if you had a large sheet of thin material you could describe it as 1 m x 2 m x 3 mm. However in metric engineering drawings it is common to keep everything in mm and describe this as 1000 x 2000 x 3 (with a note in the corner of the drawing stating all ...


2

Typical ISO practice is the most recently approved and released drawing is valid. A common work around for off the shelf parts, like bolts, is to have one generic drawing number for multiple part numbers that just lists a table of dimensions for a common part. An example for your bolt: DRAWING DRW-0010: BOLT, HEX HEAD, M20 P/N LENGTH PITCH DRW-...


2

Standards are experts common sense thoughts on the minimum safe ways to design, build and operate something. Standards are designed for voluntary use and do not impose any regulations. However, laws and regulations may refer to certain standards and make compliance with them compulsory. A building code usually refers to multiple standards, with specific ...


1

Code, as it relates to construction, is used mainly as guidelines in cases where there is an obligation to design and build structures or part of them in a certain way. ASCE is just a part of the code. It can have a wide scope, such as classifying building types and their functions. It can classify the behavior of natural phenomena like earthquakes, soils, ...


1

Cubic millimeters (mm3) would be used when describing volume of holding capacity. In your situation your third option is correct, but use spaces: 1 mm x 2 mm x 3 mm, or 1 mm by 2 mm by 3 mm. Each number needs to have the unit follow it because 10 mm x 2 mm x 4 mm could also be written as 1 cm x 2 mm x 4 mm.


1

The conversions can be found at this wikipedia page $$ 1 \frac{m^3}{s} = 1000 [NLPM] \frac{T_{gas}}{293.15}\cdot\frac{14.696 [psi]}{P_{gas}} = 1000 [SLPM] \frac{T{gas}}{273.15}\cdot\frac{14.504 [psi]}{P_{gas} [psi]} $$ where: $T_{gas}$: is the temperature that the gas is flowing $P_{gas}$: is the pressure that the gas is flowing


1

Probably ASTM A931 - 18 Standard Test Method for Tension Testing of Wire Ropes and Strand There are others closely related but not exactly the same. ASTM F3410 - 19 Standard Test Method for Testing Fiber Rope Used in Water Sports ISO 3108:2017(en), Steel wire ropes — Test method


1

What I read in the references is BSPT is tapered similar to NPS. Of course you still need pipe dope to fill the spiral leak path, so not good for very high pressures such as 1000 + psi. The BSPP requires a copper washer, known as a metal to metal seal in the trade. There are hundreds of patented tubular threads used for oil/gas well pipe with various sealing ...


1

This generator can seemingly make any fraction you want in unicode: https://qaz.wtf/u/fraction.cgi I put ¹⁄₁₆ in my Windows filename just fine. [Ironically enough, before finding the converter, I came up with using Shayne Turner's left bracket (1[16) idea.] As for indicating the inches measurement, I'm just using 2 single quotes instead of a double.


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