5

The wall is experiencing rising damp. Basically, moisture in the soil is being absorbed by the wall and traveling up the wall. This can become more prevalent during wet periods and subside during dry periods. The photograph of the outside of the wall appears to show a of line salt crystallizing towards the top of the affected zone. This is not unusual as ...


5

If you think about fast growing trees, you'll get a wind break that isn't particularly expensive or labor intensive. Farmers in the center of the continent of the USA historically used this method to reduce the amount of topsoil lost to such things. HobbyFarms recommends Eastern Red or Northern White cedar for windbreaks, although the former is a shorter ...


5

The incorrect posts are weaker as it is the dimension perpendicular to the fence which is critical. It sounds like you have a breach of contract here so you should ask them to replace with the originally specified posts without further charges to you.


4

Design of retaining walls has to deal with many factors and there is no typical design but for heights of less than 4 feet and even then for soils of known competence, in California at least, which I am aware of. Some of the factors are: Type of the soil to be retained and its properties such as density, cohesion, compaction ratio, bearing capacity, ...


3

You should be concerned a bit. During the heavy rains the wall is supporting both the pressure of the saturated heavy backfill and hydrostatic watter pressure at the same time. Repairs can be costly. You need to install sump pits or just pits filled with gravel every few feet on the back of the retaining wall and allow them to drain through pipes across the ...


3

Please note that in many municipalities, you are required to apply for a building permit before undertaking the construction of anything which requires the moving or excavation of more than a certain quantity of earth on the site. This is true for construction of retaining walls and the like. Even if you derive what you consider a safe design for this ...


2

Solutions Yes, this is a very real problem. In "professional" construction I have seen similar situations handled by either: Pouring in layers Placing the bucket of construction equipment on the form Tying (wire) the form down to something embedded in the ground (posts, columns, other concrete). As an example, when we specify pouring concrete (or ...


2

Usually since hydrostatic pressure along with freezing and thawing are such a pain (quite hard to figure out the pressure from freezing water in soil), in practice I try and keep my retaining walls 100% water free. However, if you were to design the wall for lateral earth pressure of clay + water table pressure, I found in my old notes some active, rest ...


2

retaining walls are usually under 10-foot high if they are designed based on gravity with regular toe and heel foundation. These walls are treated on the backside with a waterproofing chemical or a plastic membrane which is backfilled with gravel to let the water run down to a 4-inch diameter PVC pipe perforated on top every 6-inches installed with a slope ...


2

Design In design, the presence of water behind the wall can have two effects. It can cause additional force to be applied to the wall from hydrostatic pressure, or its presence can cause the soil characteristics to change. Changing soil properties has the most effect on clayey soils. Relatively dry clay will have cohesion and reduce the force on the wall. ...


2

I am not sure which guidance manual you are looking at, but it must in turn be referring to EN1992-1-1 section 9.2.1.1. This section defines the minimum amount of reinforcement in a beam or slab in order for the beam or slab to be considered reinforced concrete. And it does indeed use the value of 0.13% (with adjustments for concrete and steel grade). So it ...


1

First, there are different ways a post can fail. For instance, the post could buckle (though rather unlikely, as the compressive load on the post isn't that high) failure of the footing, which is mostl depending on the embedment depth. However, I assume the most likely case is failure due to bending. So, for case 1, the cross-section is square, with sides $...


1

Sue, but I'd suggest getting a lawyer, or at least consulting with one. Mostly because lawsuits can hinge on seemingly the stupidest little things. I'm not even sure you want to bring up the fact that the posts are inadequate -- it should be enough that they are not what's stipulated in the contract. If you do bring it up, I'm pretty sure (and a lawyer ...


1

If the concrete is only moderately damaged but the plastic meshes are intact, the most obvious approach is to cast a new concrete wall against the old concrete blocks. That would require drilling a large number of steel anchors into the concrete blocks first to be able to transfer forces between the plastic meshes and the new concrete. If the plastic meshes ...


1

Have a look on above photo (on your right hand side). You will see how the loads are distributed if the water level is less the the retaining wall height. The area of the green surface will be the lateral loads on the wall. Hope this will give you a basic understanding about distribution of loads.


1

It depends on the construction sequence and support conditions; however in my experience most walls like these are built by installing the piles and then excavating the open side. As you've noted, consolidation settlement is a concern for piles because the 'downdrag' force effectively reduces their capacity as a percentage of the vertical resistance is now ...


1

Similar Situation I would start by looking at a similar situation in other industries. For this I am thinking about waterproof expansion joints in bridge decks. The similarities are: Relative movements of components Waterproof Steel and/or concrete In general this seems to be a pretty good match. Products Some bridge decks have cast-in-place concrete which ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible