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1

I have no experience in the engineering industry, but I used to be part of an undergraduate engineering competition team that designed and built planetary rovers and autonomous underwater vehicles. Perhaps I can provide a perspective of doing CAD in a small team of 10 to 20 students. Members of the team usually have an idea of how the final product might ...


4

First, a big (100 or 1000 engineers) project is very unlikely to start from a blank piece of paper. A company like Boeing has designed many planes in the past, and therefore has a pretty good idea how to "guess" an initial design for a new one. One method that works is to start from an initial "guessed" design and refine it. Given the ...


1

For your first question - how many people work independently but collectively to finish a product or a large project. It is done by using cad collaboration software with a master plan that linking everybody's work and updates instantaneously, or at the scheduled intervals by the lead person. For the individual draftsperson, if linked properly, you are always ...


2

I would like to add a bit to the two answers above. More of a practical explanation of your CAD question. Latest CAD, CAM and CAE software allow multi-user simultaneous work by using referenced models. That is, as you mentioned the assembly with part A and part B. There's an assembly model that references (links) the models of the two parts. Also while ...


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It's a massively important question. Short response: apply the concept of encapsulation. Divide into subsystems During development, assign design-ownership (distinct from project manager role, although may coincide in a small group) to subsystems, and to the higher level design Define interfaces (mounting, electrical, thermal, plumbing, material flow, etc) ...


3

Your question is a fundamental problem and does not have a single way to be handled. IMHO it boils down to the management of engineers and designers and is fundamental to the success of a company. IMHO (it might be very simplistic compared to what Jonathan R. Swift might have to offer, since I've only worked in a small company with less than 20 engineers ...


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