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Yes, if it's airtight, but I wouldn't say 'collapse'. The water on the left side will be suctioned in to compensate for the loss of volume of the right-side water disappearing to the bag.


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Sorry, I don't have enough reputation to commenton Nikolay Jolshin's answer. Regardless of the pressure at the exit, if you know the difference in pressure you can use Torricelli's equation. I just want to add that, depending on the application, you might also need to consider loses due to speed. For example adding a speed coeficient to Torricelli's eq. Many ...


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The more complex the geometry, the less likely generalized equations are going to be able to represent it. I understand what you are saying about the area of the volute getting larger as the fluid travels the pathline, but this is inside of a rotating reference frame so you can't compare it to static geometry. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) verified by ...


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Assume point "P" is rigid, calculate the fluid pressures on both sides of the wall, from the respective free water surface down to point "P", then sum the moments about it. I assume you know how to calculate the resultant forces, and the locations of their application (1/3 height of the respective pressure diagram above the base).


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I believe I need to set my limits of integration so that point P is zero and then my torque will be P(z)*z --> (integral from 0 to -z+depth of P) P(z)zdz I can do that for both sides and add the torques


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It might help to consider the special case of Hatton's excellent answer, where the velocity is very small. A small piston at one end of a tube, then an expansion to a large piston at the other end, is an idealised hydraulic jack. When not moving it is considered to have the same pressure at each end, so can support a car at the large end with a small force ...


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The static pressure is the compressive longitudinal stress exerted by the pipe walls on the fluid and vice versa, but perhaps more importantly in this context, it is also the compressive longitudinal stress exerted on every little parcel of fluid by the parcels of fluid next to it, in every direction. If the pressure didn't decrease along the length of the ...


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Let's start with a few clarifying points: for INCOMPRESSIBLE flow an increase in area = a decrease in velocity = an increase in (static) pressure (this is simply the continuity equation mass flow rate=density * velocity * area in which density is assumed constant) This pressure here is the pressure exerted by the fluid on a cross-section normal to the flow. ...


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