5

While pneumatic systems can be controlled in a non-discrete manner as GisMofx mentioned, that is generally not the norm because the control system to achieve that movement is more expensive that comparative electric actuators. The result is still less precise and less responsive. This is the reason that all CNC machines are electric. Pneumatic systems are ...


5

Don't do it!! Just buy a pressure regulator to put between the two tanks that will decrease the pressure to below 125. You can get these for \$17 at home depot (https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-1-4-in-NPT-Regulator-with-Gauge-41155HOM/205331831) and maybe even cheaper elsewhere. I'm terrified of the tank exploding and covering me with shrapnel. This is a ...


4

In the 1940's and 50's, dynamic system controllers were invented which used air pressure to work. It was possible in fact to design and build not only analog control mechanisms but also binary logic devices that ran on compressed air and which could perform simple switching functions. These devices were less expensive and more durable than electronic logic ...


4

The formula is valid independant of the fluid. The force in an hydraulic system is based on pressure and area - a height difference between pistons is usually small compared to the acting pressure from the pump - this is why is is usually ignored. Think of the pressure created by the difference in height of the pistons in tipper truck systems for example ...


4

The equivalent of a capacitor in terms of pneumatics would be a chamber such as a metal sphere the size of a tennis ball. It would be necessary to have an external vacuum pump to evacuate the air prior to the quick release. Auto tire houses use the reverse concept to seat a new tire on the rim. A cylindrical tank is loaded to substantial pressure by a ...


3

Yes, it's possible. See here: Position Control of a Pneumatic Actuator and this youtube video here: Pneumatic Actuator With Position Control on YouTube Many solutions use a servo controlled pneumatic valve in conjunction with a position sensor on the actuator to control pressures on both sides of the piston to maintain a specific position or motion ...


3

It is a gas spring. They are rated in units of pounds and travel in inches. Typically ranges are 10 to 200 pounds, and 6 to 24 inches. Here is one example : https://www.amazon.com/JR-Products-GSNI-5300-60-Gas-Spring/dp/B002UCAHAE/ref=lp_16413861_1_3?s=industrial&ie=UTF8&qid=1500165912&sr=1-3 The particular one being shown in your diagram is a ...


3

Based on the threads at the end of your sample cylinder, you would be seeking a female threaded rod end: There are a multitude of variations of this product, almost always including the words "rod end" with different modifiers. You could have a forked threaded rod end. It would not have to be female threads, of course. Depending on the work load, you may ...


3

The device is called a "receiver" in pneumatics - this is basically the tank you see on any garage compressor, or much larger and more elaborate setups in industrial settings. Its function can be modelled almost exactly like a capacitor. It stores energy by accumulating air inside of it (the integral of the incoming flow, just as charge is the integral of ...


3

I understand your setup as follows (in flow direction): compressor with cutout set to 150 PSI tank (T1) rated for compressor, with safety valve (planned) pressure regulator (PR) additional tank (T2), rated 120 PSI, with safety valve If this is so the safety valve of the second tank will protect you unless you tinkered with or replaced this safety valve. ...


3

In industrial settings, the correct piece of equipment is referred to as either a Pressure Relief Valve (PRV) or Pressure Safety Valve (PSV). These are spring-loaded valves with a few specific characteristics The valve is designed with a spring load, and is ordered with a relief pressure in mind (in your case, 120 PSI) the valve is sized with a valve ...


3

The specification for that valve states: Working Pressure: 0.15 ~ 0.8 Mpa For those still using colonial units, that's a minimum pressure of 28 psi. The reason it doesn't move is that it's a pilot operated valve. A small airline is tapped off the pressure inlet and goes across the valve to the pilot. The solenoid opens the pilot allowing air to push the ...


3

A pneumatic cylinder is linear by definition The form factor for a cylinder defines this. You can turn this linear motion to rotary via a crankshaft or rack & pinion, to give two examples. You can also purchase a rotary pneumatic actuator, and, yes, there are some knuckleheads out there calling them "rotary cylinders." These people should be ...


2

The difference is the side on which pressure is regulated, and the reaction curve. Typical pressure regulator takes arbitrary input pressure (from compressor) and provides specified (lower) pressure on output, locking the valve as output pressure rises; not allowing it to drop below preset level. The vacuum regulator assures the input pressure is as ...


2

Sort of. Certainly things like pressure cookers and turbochargers use blow off vales as a routine way to regulate pressure. Generally this is to make sure that internal pressure doesn't exceed some design maximum rather than for fine control and it is a bit contextual as it tends to imply that whatever working fluid you are dealing with goes to 'waste'. ...


2

I'm sure someone has invented such a thing, but you could do the same with a distribution header/pipe and multiple outlet solenoids. Your software would determine which solenoid were turned on or off. This would have the exact number of outlet solenoids you desire. A device to do this as a single entity would likely just be a block with several solenoids, ...


2

It's common for CNC equipment to use air pressure to manipulate tools and collets and mandrels and other "non-precision" mechanical components. In the case of tooling, the engagement sockets provide the precision, while the air pressure locks the collars to the mechanism. Air pressure can be rapidly applied in a closed system, but not so rapidly reversed ...


2

One tube with a long axial slot which tightly fits inside another which has holes spaced such that rotating the internal tube connects to each hole in turn. One issue is when you need to get to hole 12 from hole 1 all the hole in between may be activated for a short time, cutting the flow may be a solution.


2

The only way to keep pressure constant as volume is reduced is by let out the same amount of liquid/gas as the volume contracts. That is exactly what a pressure reducing valve does. As long as it has the capacity to vent at the rate you need you should be fine.


2

Have a second separate balloon that expands as the first is compressed. This will also keep the pressure constant as the volume is increased if that is part of your requirement.


2

Draw the schematic! Figure 1. (a) The circuit. (b) Step 1. (c) Step 2. The circuit relies on slight differences in timing of the various components due to differences in friction and tolerance to get started. As shown in 1(a) the circuit is just three pilot operate valves. The springs push the spools into the position shown and all valves are "open" (they ...


2

I searched for "Schraeder Hose Barb". !


2

A 10 or 25 psig overpressure of a tank is well into a potential failure for the tank. The 140 psig safety valve is used because that accounts for the true pressure capability of the tank plus the tolerance in lift pressure for the safety valve. If you replace it with a 150 psig valve, you are risking the tank building up pressure past it's breaking point to ...


2

If the pressure is not too high you can use something like the Luer system there are plenty of options for connectors and valves etc.. I have found parts up to 1050 PSI. But most stuff can't handle more than 50 PSI. You can get them from all kinds of medical supply sites and even sites like ebay and amazon. I have found this site after a quick search for ...


2

A typical 2 way solenoid valve would not restrict airflow towards one direction. So in your case is perfectly valid, since you will be removing the pressure from the inlet. What you would normally do if you wanted to prevent backflow is to place a check valve. Below is a cutout of typical two way valve operation states.


2

Figure 1. A Kinetrol rotary actuator. This type of rotary actuator is also known as a vane type. This one has a 90° action and is popular for controlling ball or butterfly valves. Figure 2. A rack and pinion style rotary actuator. Image source: Hydraulics Pneumatics. These convert linear motion into rotary. The angular rotation is limited only by the length ...


1

I would keep all the control hardware/components off of the moving members as much as possible and in the same general area for ease of wiring and trouble shooting. Use nylon tubing, its more "rigid" such that the tubing diameter will not flex or change. In electro-pneumatic machines, I usually build a pneumatic "panel/enclosure" with all my air prep/...


1

If it is a double-acting cylinder then possibly fine, BUT you will need to check the seals are not going to be damaged by the oil and make sure that the pressure inside the cylinder, on both sides of the piston, is greater than the oil pressure so oil is less likely to make its way past the seals. A single acting cylinder needs to be able to fill or expel ...


1

Both water and air are fluid. And they transfer the pressure equally every where. On the right hand case if your samples are submerged in water they feel the pressure everywhere. In material testing labs when they need to test a sample for its compressive strength they prepare the sample with capping it smooth with a special paste which is chemically ...


1

I see a few possible issues: do the amounts of air add up? you need 20 CFM @ 90 psi, that's about 120 CFM @ 15 psi (close to normal conditions) but the dryer is rated for 45 CFM In all applications I've seen (that I talked through with sales engineers for the air supply) the dryer was installed downstream of the compressor The globe valve seems suspect, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible