5

One is called a press, the other is called a hammer. At this point I am just regurgitating what I have read. You can see that the press is able to shape the metal more which is is good in that it is faster but worse in that you have less control. The hammer takes longer to shape the metal but that means you have more control. In addition, the press is in ...


3

You put it well ; " no practical difference." The zinc as a sacrificial coating protects nearby steel provided there is electric conductivity such as a film of water . Lazer cutting will burn off little zinc very close to the cut ,but not significant. From your description this sounds like a component that will be inside so corrosion potential ...


2

If the problem were to just make a box that itself did not burn in an housefire, that seems trivial and somewhat useless - 100 cm cube of brick that holds 0 (pick your volumetric units) contents If the goal is to protect the contents from a fire you have to understand that many items one wants to protect would deterioriate with heat. Even the best insulation ...


2

First, you need a better specification than "fireproof." Is the objective to build a box that survives a flame for a certain time? Is it to protect the contents? Does the box need to keep people out or things in? Be specific. Fireproof items will be typically built with some type of clay-ish fire brick. Depending on how long and how hot the ...


2

How do you measure the temperature? If you use an infrared thermometer, this won‘t work because of reflection. Use a thermistor based measurement device for verification.


1

Springback will mostly be controlled by yield strength. And because all three materials have the same minimum yield (140 Mpa), the only option is to bend samples. You could get identical results with all three materials. Also , your material supplier has poor process control ; notice DC 01 has a range of yield from 140 to 280 MPa. You need luck or a new ...


1

Zinc protects by sealing the steel, but also protects it by acting as a sacrificial anode if that seal is breached. So yes, exposed edges does make the steel more susceptible to corrosion, but not altogether unprotected as long as zinc remains to act as an anode. However, once the zinc is consumed then that protection no longer exists.


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