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Your assumption is right! A 300mm long plate with two foldings won't do! This is because you need to take into account the bend allowance and the bend compensation! But why is so? Here is a diagram of what's going on: When you bend a material, part of it will extend (the external part of the bend), while another part will retract (the internal part). The ...


5

One is called a press, the other is called a hammer. At this point I am just regurgitating what I have read. You can see that the press is able to shape the metal more which is is good in that it is faster but worse in that you have less control. The hammer takes longer to shape the metal but that means you have more control. In addition, the press is in ...


5

I would like to fold thin metal sheets to a particular angle. It sounds like you're looking for a sheet metal brake. I'm sure you can find less expensive models elsewhere. Lots of places rent them too. Heck, with the thicknesses you're using, you can make one with some hardwood and hinges.


3

Your raw material will come in the form of a large spool of sheet metal containing a strip of steel hundreds of meters long. You will need an unspooler to feed steel off the spool and a straightener to take the curvature out of the steel strip. Then you need either a punch press or a shear to cut the sheet metal blanks to size and trim their corners. To put ...


3

You put it well ; " no practical difference." The zinc as a sacrificial coating protects nearby steel provided there is electric conductivity such as a film of water . Lazer cutting will burn off little zinc very close to the cut ,but not significant. From your description this sounds like a component that will be inside so corrosion potential ...


2

Depends on the ductility of the "sheet metal".Commonly steel or aluminum, but that is just part of the answer ; the particular alloy and condition/temper must be known . Also die life- number of parts to be made from a set of dies.And as commented, the force available in the press.


2

If the problem were to just make a box that itself did not burn in an housefire, that seems trivial and somewhat useless - 100 cm cube of brick that holds 0 (pick your volumetric units) contents If the goal is to protect the contents from a fire you have to understand that many items one wants to protect would deterioriate with heat. Even the best insulation ...


2

First, you need a better specification than "fireproof." Is the objective to build a box that survives a flame for a certain time? Is it to protect the contents? Does the box need to keep people out or things in? Be specific. Fireproof items will be typically built with some type of clay-ish fire brick. Depending on how long and how hot the ...


2

How do you measure the temperature? If you use an infrared thermometer, this won‘t work because of reflection. Use a thermistor based measurement device for verification.


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Zinc protects by sealing the steel, but also protects it by acting as a sacrificial anode if that seal is breached. So yes, exposed edges does make the steel more susceptible to corrosion, but not altogether unprotected as long as zinc remains to act as an anode. However, once the zinc is consumed then that protection no longer exists.


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They will need to be sized appropriate to the load that will be applied, which means that they are not “standard”. You need to make sure the part that bends is sufficiently strong and will have sufficient life when it is flexed often.


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Yes use Aluminum 5052 H32 for sheet metal parts with bends. r =or> T. I do it like this, get the lengths of the straight lines and set aside. The t/T is a little more than .50, say .53 until you get the real number. K= t/T, radius of the neutral line is inside r + t = r + .53T For a 90 degree bend, length of the bend is 2*pi*(r+t)/4 = pi*(r+t)/2 = pi*(r+.53T)...


1

I've had a quick go - it's hard to be more precise without measurements, and it should be stressed that the actual bent shape of the metal is very weird, and difficult to model. Hopefully this will give you a method to get started with, however, and you can adjust spline handle lengths and dimensions etc. as you go. The steps go as follows: Model the 'non-...


1

In a mechanical engineering curriculum at university, you would probably take a series of 3 classes. First would be called "Strengths of Materials" (or maybe "mechanics of materials"). This would be a sophomore level class. No tensors, just linear algebra (matrices). The second class would be "theory of elasticity". This is going to involve tensors. ...


1

As Mahendra Gunawardena said, there's not one universally used method of pricing manufacturing projects, but there are some pretty common facts that result from the economics of the situation. Firstly, if you're talking about small runs at a large company and the design doesn't include anything exotic, the pricing will probably have less to do with the ...


1

You will have to use vapor deposition under high vacuum. This requires a piston vacuum pump to get a rough vacuum, then a turbomolecular or diffusion pump to get to high vacuum. Then heat gold in this vacuum till it melts. Gold vapor will deposit a thin layer on all surfaces of the container including your glasses. glasslinger demonstrates vapor deposition ...


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