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Your assumption is right! A 300mm long plate with two foldings won't do! This is because you need to take into account the bend allowance and the bend compensation! But why is so? Here is a diagram of what's going on: When you bend a material, part of it will extend (the external part of the bend), while another part will retract (the internal part). The ...


5

I would like to fold thin metal sheets to a particular angle. It sounds like you're looking for a sheet metal brake. I'm sure you can find less expensive models elsewhere. Lots of places rent them too. Heck, with the thicknesses you're using, you can make one with some hardwood and hinges.


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Your raw material will come in the form of a large spool of sheet metal containing a strip of steel hundreds of meters long. You will need an unspooler to feed steel off the spool and a straightener to take the curvature out of the steel strip. Then you need either a punch press or a shear to cut the sheet metal blanks to size and trim their corners. To put ...


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As Mahendra Gunawardena said, there's not one universally used method of pricing manufacturing projects, but there are some pretty common facts that result from the economics of the situation. Firstly, if you're talking about small runs at a large company and the design doesn't include anything exotic, the pricing will probably have less to do with the ...


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I've had a quick go - it's hard to be more precise without measurements, and it should be stressed that the actual bent shape of the metal is very weird, and difficult to model. Hopefully this will give you a method to get started with, however, and you can adjust spline handle lengths and dimensions etc. as you go. The steps go as follows: Model the 'non-...


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In a mechanical engineering curriculum at university, you would probably take a series of 3 classes. First would be called "Strengths of Materials" (or maybe "mechanics of materials"). This would be a sophomore level class. No tensors, just linear algebra (matrices). The second class would be "theory of elasticity". This is going to involve tensors. ...


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You will have to use vapor deposition under high vacuum. This requires a piston vacuum pump to get a rough vacuum, then a turbomolecular or diffusion pump to get to high vacuum. Then heat gold in this vacuum till it melts. Gold vapor will deposit a thin layer on all surfaces of the container including your glasses. glasslinger demonstrates vapor deposition ...


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Yes use Aluminum 5052 H32 for sheet metal parts with bends. r =or> T. I do it like this, get the lengths of the straight lines and set aside. The t/T is a little more than .50, say .53 until you get the real number. K= t/T, radius of the neutral line is inside r + t = r + .53T For a 90 degree bend, length of the bend is 2*pi*(r+t)/4 = pi*(r+t)/2 = pi*(r+.53T)...


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