7

There's a story on them at PBS. From the article: A nurse injects a patient with a syringe of antibiotics, reloads and moves on to the next patient in line. The syringe isn’t sterilized, the needle is not replaced, and the patient is at risk of contracting a disease from the very shot that is supposed to cure him. ... About 40 percent of all injections ...


3

A typical DIY shop would fall over the electronics immediately. This is more a piece of electronics than a mechanical device. First of all, the shop would need the source of the chips which as far as I can tell aren't even referenced. This is a set of assembly drawings, not complete product specifications. It tells you how to build a circuit board, but ...


3

I think you could hack any poppet valve engine block to create a rapid pressure swing adsorbtion machine, but better to start with a block designed as a compressor in the first place. Lubricating oil sequestering would be an issue. Most people don't really understand the relationship between manufacturing, logistics, and assembly. They probably think they ...


3

I really have no idea, but I did come up with the following possibilities. To minimize reflections from the instrument itself. Light reflecting off the endoscope could interfere with the doctor's view. Because little (if any) body tissue inside the body is black, thus making it easier to distinguish the instrument from body parts. Because that's the ...


3

The endoscope has pairs of cords running along the length, which are called angulation wires. The levers on the operator end pull the cords differentially, which makes the tip turn. ( Source; the article pretty much answers the original question. ) ( Source. ) ( Source. )


2

I've had the possibility to test several different diagnostic ultrasound devices in a big bucket of water with gravel at the bottom! The result is interesting: At first, for all devices you have to use a "curved sound head", the linear one doesn't work at distances further than a few centimeters. With cheap devices I could hardly see the bottom or the gravel....


2

The amount of protection offered by ear muffs depends on a number of things. Firstly, how the muffs are constructed & the materials used and the sound attenuation properties of those materials. The other thing that is important is how the muffs are worn. You probably know that the cup of each muff must fully encapsulate each ear. For ear muffs to ...


1

A medical device known as an incentive inspirometer measures volume of air inhaled. Twenty years ago, I could pull five liters (was serious cyclist) but now I'm down to four liters per breath. Sixteen breaths per minute means sixty-four liters per minute. At the five liter value, that's eighty liters per minute, in resting state.


1

Automotive manufacturing encompasses a wide range of types of devices, many of which are broadly similar in terms of their structure and function to medical devices. e.g. processing electronics, actuators, sensors, feedback displays. They are also reasonably similar in the size of devices they make - this sort-of makes sense from an abstract perspective, as ...


1

It is difficult to tease out proprietary trade secrets from manufacturing companies; and it is further confusing to deal with misleading terms aimed at applications and clinical handling of these products. The main hurdle in understanding what's going on under the hood in these algorithms is the label "statistical algorithms" for hybrid systems. It ...


1

The accepted error in pulse oximtery isn't that good. It's about $\pm$2 % so your additional significant figures are useless. A good review is Aoyagi, T. J Anesth (2003) 17: 259. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00540-003-0192-6


1

You can use a float type flowmeter: A float sits in a conically expanding tube, the higher the flow rate the higher the float hovers. In the closest catalog I have at hand, the smallest meter is for flow rates in 0.2 m³/h - 2.5 m³/h range (gas applications).


1

I happen to be a cancer patient and have had the PET-CT. The way they explained it to me is after giving you a rapidly decaying radioactive sugar with a half-life of about one hour which has one carbon switched with fluoride. Then the hungry cancer cells break the sugar, positrons are released which in a deadly collision with electrons release two gamma ...


1

Why not wear foam earplugs? The right earplug, properly used, have a NRR of 33dB, which is really close to the 35 dB rating of your earmuffs. 3dB is considered the minimum human detectable threashold for sound, so it's unlikely that you'd notice any difference even in ideal conditions. It's the ideal conditions part that typically causes problems with ...


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