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Because some had threads. I guess those fell on the floor before they got to the threading die were used for shafts. In response to a comment, they used to form the head and shaft first, then cut the threads on a lathe one by one using the head as a driver. Master screw on right. Blank to be threaded on left. They are connected by the doughnut thingie. The ...


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"...but without that screwdriver slot I'd have never gotten the bobbin winder off of the machine." It sounds like you've answered your own question here - these machines were designed to be easy to maintain, they had to be, for use in an industrial setting.


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When you this part was assembled, how would you align the two holes for the set screw without something to mark the rotational position of the post, and something to turn it accurately? The screwdriver slot has both functions.


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You can do this with a pair of Omron programmable timer modules that mount onto DIN rails, no software required. They are extremely flexible and can be easily configured to perform a variety of tasks like this. They are basically a set of relay contacts which are exercised by an internal clock, packaged into a small plastic enclosure with a clock display and ...


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An alternative to an H-Bridge (preferred method if you are already using a controller - it also lets you use those overkill relays for other projects) would be having +/-6V at the motor. This would mean a 12V supply with one leg of the motor at a regulated 6V. You connect the second leg to 12V for one direction and 0V for the other direction, getting you 6 ...


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If I am not mistaken, you can use an H-Bridge for that. If you are using an arduino for example, there are a few motor drivers like L298N which do exactly that job (control the direction and speed of a dc motor).


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Use a pulley with spooled string on it dropping a weight on the input shaft for input torque, and a pulley spooling up a string with a weight on the output shaft for load torque. With pulley radius and mass you can calculate input and output torques. You then need an RPM sensor on one of the shafts and you can use the gear ratio to calculate the RPM on the ...


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The pour point of standard ISO32 hydraulic oil is around 40F (4.5C) depending on additives. Below that temperature the oil behaves like a semi solid rather than a linear-viscous fluid. Forcing the oil through pumps / valves / elbows / lines requires far greater pressure differential, as Chuck's answer noted. Typical measurements of viscosity stop around 0C ...


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The valve timing in an ICE typically contains overlap, in which the intake valve begins opening before the exhaust valve is finished closing. This lets the engine "breathe" better at high speeds and produce more power there, but it also allows some of the exhaust gas to blow backwards into the intake before any more work can be extracted from it ...


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The datasheet of the TAL220 mentions parallel beam type. This is (probably) the same as what is more commonly know as double bending beam (however the shape can also also allude to shear load cell). In any case all those types are fairly insensitive to the application load. If I were in your shoes (i.e. I was stuck with a product), and if you are certain ...


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Correct. The position of forces will affect the reactions at points A & B as shown. $\sum M_A = 0$ $R_B = \dfrac{W*a + P_1*b + P_2*c}{a}$ (Compression) $R_A = W + P_1 + P_2 - R_B$ (Tension) Note: W = Weight of the top plate (conveniently assumed its centroid falls on point B). The weight of the lower lever arm is ignored in the calculation.


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