8

The intuitive meaning of Saint Venant's principle is that "if two different sets of applied loads are statically equivalent, then the differences between the two stress patterns they create are only significant close to where the loads are applied". This is used very frequently in engineering modelling. For example if a beam is bolted to a support with ...


7

To add to @alephzero's answer, here's an layman's explanation of Saint-Venant's Principle: far enough away from the load's point of application, equivalent loads can be treated as identical. For instance, the stress profile of a column of area $A$ with a concentrated load $F$ applied at the top is effectively identical to the stress profile of the same ...


6

Figure 1. Silicone steel stamped lamination, stator and rotor. Image source:HS Magnets Figure 2. On their way to becoming motors.


5

I can't address all the questions you've posed, but at least one of the answers comes directly from the inventor, Bill Booth, as noted in the wiki. He holds the patent for the device (held?) and I had the opportunity to fly with him a couple of decades ago. All of the following is word of mouth. Perhaps there is documentation to back it up, but I heard it ...


5

How about a levered latch like this (very rough sketch) showing the catching tooth above the self latching spring and the pivot point.


5

When trying to figure out whether or not a given reaction will exist at a given support, it's worth remembering what a reaction actually is. A reaction is the means by which the support resists the movement of the beam at that point. Force reactions resist the beam's attempts to deflect up-down or left-right at the support. Moment reactions resist the beam'...


4

What you seek is called 3D photogrammetry and is a relatively exciting segment of 3D modeling. You can use those terms to search with your favorite search engine and be overwhelmed with options. I found a link to a summary performed a bit more than a year ago, which might be more useful to you. https://pfalkingham.wordpress.com/2016/09/14/trying-all-the-...


4

This is a statically indeterminate problem. I don't know what exactly you mean by moments develop at the fixed supports But I guess you mean if there exist any non-zero components of moment at the fixed points. The answer is yes. A simple and lengthy calculations yields: $$M_{\text{Fixed points}} = \left|\frac{FL}{8}\right|$$ The sign of the moments ...


4

The clutch provides an instant disconnect either for scheduled maintenance or in an emergency. If the water flow is stopped instantly, then the energy of that moving pipeful of water has to be dissipated and can cause a lot of damage. Some systems are fitted with surge pipes for exactly that reason. On one system I worked with, slowing the flow from max to ...


4

Because some programs for some operations can be written quicker than the time it takes to produce the equivalent CAD file. Also use of variables makes the program more useful ie a program to produce a cylinder can be written to take diameter as the controlling argument while producing many CAD files for various different diameters takes time.


4

Yes, it would be easier to drill the hole but there are other reasons. It's makes the shaft the same width as the red bearing also clamped by the green sides. The shaft will experience torque when the knob at the top is tightened. A hole though a round shaft would have high pressure on the curved edge at a point on each side some little distance away from ...


4

Figure 1. A scroll compressor. Image credit: Cacycle.


3

You have the right general approach, and the numbers look reasonable. Your airspeed isn't very fast, so I'm not surprised that the convection coefficient you calculate is less than 10 W m-2 K-1. Note, however, that you're applying the heat flux you calculated at a plate temperature of 288 K for all other temperatures as well. In reality, the convective flux ...


3

The circled portions of the image provided are not rivets. They are locking adjustment screws. According to information provided in an answer (number 2) on the bicycles stack exchange, the primary purpose of those screws is to provide a uniform gap between the brake band and the drum when the brake lever is released. There is one long rivet in the 4 o'clock ...


3

In your example the pickup trucks are not load bearing because the weight of the trailer is resting on the trailer wheels. As such the drive wheels of the pickup trucks are likely to skid. The goose necks have no additional function since they do not carry any weight from the trailer, using a chain or towstrap between the trucks would have the same effect.


3

I assume that you are talking about a steel frame with a wooden body mounted on it. In general round tube is more efficient, but if the loading is primarily bending in one direction rectangular section can be better. So for something like a space frame chassis or roll cage where the whole structure can be subject to quite complex loading round tube is ...


3

It says the flats shall be within 0.100 units of radial dimension positioned with reference to 'A'. i.e. if you were to make the rim which is a perfect circle, then mill the flats at the three positions, what you should see is that the flats are exactly the same sectional shape and size if the machinist was perfectly precise. Some minor deviation from ...


3

I believe this is a related mating envelope related to datum A for the three plates, per ASME Y14.5-2009.


3

From a theoretical standpoint, the displacement gradient is equivalent to strain (assuming a structural problem). Numerically, you can obtain the derivate of a quantity through multiplication with the derivative of the shape functions, which is often referred to as the B matrix: du = B u


3

The life time of gears (which a rack and pinion mechanism basically is) is limited by teeth failure, wear, and pitting. So the answer to your question not only depends on the force acting on the rack, but also the required lifetime, lubrication, geometry of the gear and rack, and material combination. Meaning that while your rack might hold this force for an ...


3

Let’s consider gears as being represented by a pitch circle on which lie several equally spaced dots with a number equal to the number of teeth. These dots can either represent the teeth or the gaps between teeth, and they follow the rule that, as a pair of meshing gears rotate, the dots of one gear will coincide with the dots of the other gear as the dots ...


3

I'd call the blue part the transmitter housing. This usually contains electronics for sensor signal conversion, which converts the sensor (or probe) low level signal to a standard 4-20 mA signal. The sensor (probe) is the metallic cylinder. And the sensor head (containing the sensing element, membrane/coil) is usually located at the end surface of the ...


3

Essentially, the problem is poorly conditioned. As drawn, it cannot be in static equilibrium, which is why the equations of equilibrium are returning inconsistent solutions. We can confirm this by summing the moments about the point where force "X" is applied. Let's take counter-clockwise moments as positive. $$\Sigma M = (-200*300) + (100*800) = 20,000 \...


3

That is on the high pressure end of normal pneumatic conveying blowers, but they are out there. See the notice at the bottom of the attached chart. http://www.hsiblowers.com/products/high-speed-turbo-blowers.html You don't want a high pressure compressor, you just need to find the right compressor that will deliver at 18 psi. You need to specify if the ...


3

The impulse causes lateral acceleration of the rod and rotation of the rod. $$ P=m\frac{dv}{dt} \quad \text{for lateral acceleration}$$ $$ P=I\frac{d\omega}{dt} \quad \text{for rotational acceleration}$$ We calculate the net acceleration for each point along the length of the rod and after multiplying that by the density of the rod we get the forces' acting ...


3

If the screws look like a pair of thick and long interlocking archimedes screws, then the device is called a rotary screw compressor. You can think of it as a special case of a roots blower, where the interlocking lobes on the lobe shafts possess a spiral twist. By making the lobe depth progressively shallower along the length of the screws, the working ...


2

Mohr's circle is a graphical representation of the state of stress at a point. Once the Mohr's circle for a point is constructed, we can easily determine the normal and shear stress components on any plane passing through that point. While using the Mohr's circle the vertical axis represents shear stress and the horizontal axis represents normal stress. If ...


2

The snifter valve allowed air and some steam to escape - this did not differentiate between air and steam, just opened briefly when steam was entering. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newcomen_atmospheric_engine The opening on early engines was manual - but as they increased in speed this had to become automatic which led to the "Potter Cord" and later a ...


2

As noted by fred_dot_u, each ring acts as a "Class 2 Lever". Imagine you are trying to lift the orange beam shown below from a position close to the pivot (distance y). The force somebody else would need to apply at the far end (distance x) would be smaller, by a factor of X/Y Imagine now than instead of applying your force directly upwards, you instead ...


2

You may find your objective obtainable via the world of Arduino in concert with radio control servos. The Arduino will support direct connection to a single servo without requiring an external driver circuit, while the programming can be custom tailored to your camera's requirements. The mechanical aspect is going to be limited only to your fabrication ...


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