9

The tension on the rope is everywhere the same and its equal to F. So if you did a free body diagram on the following system by sectioning along the ropes: what you get from the equilibrium is $4F = 48[N]$. I hope that is sufficient as an explanation, I tend to find that problems with pulleys can have different configurations and as such it is always ...


8

The ISO metric bolt has its diameter as the numeral part of the name. So M8 has a diameter of 8mm compared to that of the M4 bolt. So far scaling would make sense. However, the pitch of them is not proportional and would be wrong if you scale them. her is a figure from Wikipedia. Wiki .


6

The Load-Displacement (or Load Extension) and stress strain diagrams are two diagrams identical in shape. See below. The main visible difference is the values on axis (which are at first glance neglected). So, it is natural when you first encounter them to question why do you want to learn about a stress and strain diagram which has obscure quantities (as ...


5

We cannot obtain negative temperatures in thermodynamics calculations. Only the absolute scales prevent this. The two absolute scales are Kelvin and degrees Rankin. Here are the two calculations to show that both give the same result. I take that $r^{k-1} = 3.45$ based on using your Rankin values. $$T_f = (50 + 459.67)(3.45) = 1763\ ^o\mathrm{R}$$ $$T_i = ((...


4

A riser is a static reserve volume of metal available to flow into the casting to compensate for shrinkage as the liquid freezes. Risers are relatively large because they should not freeze until after the casting has frozen. Risers may be "hot topped", exothermic material is put on to provide extra heat to keep the riser liquid as long as possible. ...


4

I think you need to understand what a "tolerance" means in an assembly items. My token view is, a tolerance is the permissible deviation of a part from its ideal design dimension. Additionally, under the non-ideal situation, the assembly will not lose its intended functionality, and desired level of performance. After that, you may start to tighten ...


4

You left off a "T" ; it is "time, temperature, transformation". It is a basis to evaluate hardenability of alloy steels. A sample is austenitized, then rapidly cooled to some temperature ,and held at that temperature for a specific time . Then rapidly cooled to room temperature and the microstructure examined . And after one finishes the ...


4

Figure 1. A scroll compressor. Image credit: Cacycle.


3

If the screws look like a pair of thick and long interlocking archimedes screws, then the device is called a rotary screw compressor. You can think of it as a special case of a roots blower, where the interlocking lobes on the lobe shafts possess a spiral twist. By making the lobe depth progressively shallower along the length of the screws, the working ...


3

I think you've most criteria covered for the case you are considering in your post. The only criterion I haven't seen is wear and tear. Regarding wear and tear there are mainly the following considerations: the first is that the smaller gear should not have less than 11 teeth under any circumstances (preferably not less that 14 if possible). Usually 17 ...


3

You could have a 8mm hole drilled and reamed slightly undersize for a press fit 8mm dowel pin and use a 8mm/8mm swivel clamp which would let you set the angle and height as desired (photo from McMaster).


3

First thing first, you need to get hand on the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (BPVC Code). Starting division 8, section 1, for safety and quality of your pressure vessel. After checking on all relevant provisions/standards, you can use the equations to derive the required wall thickness for your application. Notation σ_H = hoop stress, psi or MPa D = ...


3

To my knowledge when you are doing thermodynamic calculations you should always use K (Kelvin), unless stated otherwise in the textbook you are using. Otherwise the results from those relationships (with powers) will always be all over the place. Another way to put it (probably more correct) is, "Always use the units in the textbook. When in doubt use ...


2

At that high temperature , there are some things like carbides and intermetallics going into solid solution. Also some chemical homogenization ( which is similar to the solution). To a small degree the temperature is becoming more uniform ; although the surface has reached temperature the core of a thick component takes longer to reach temperature ; Usually ...


2

The answer is "Yes", and the direct source to find such relationship is from the technical publishing, that offer steel design tables/charts showing the most optimum beam/column sections for certain load with respect to the length of the beam column. The image below is an example of a chart comparing moment capacity (indicated on the left axis) of ...


2

Depends what you mean by "manganese steel". If you mean a low alloy like AISI 1100 types , you are above the curie temperature or you are measuring wrong . If you mean a Hadfield type ( 11 to 14 % Mn) it cooled quickly enough to be mostly retained austenite . It certainly has nothing to do with ferrite stabilizing as that would be magnetic. Because ...


2

The most precise way to control flow is with valves/flow regulator. The main problem is the cost. Although, its a very basic component and its not too costly if you have too many outlets the cost will pile up. Even if you had matching orifices, you might have issues with the pressure drop inside the pipes and corners. Another way to control the flow would ...


2

One basic way is to adjust the valves, the dry ones fully open and the ones bleeding all the pressure just slightly open, or even restricted permanently by a smaller size bushing just before the valve. In conjunction with that, you can install a water tank between the pump and your network with an adequate head and a hydraulic actuator to stop the tank's ...


2

Some threaded inserts have flanged faces for a few reasons, one being that if you press the flange flush to the surface around the hole you're tapped hole will be relatively perpendicular. These can just be hammered in. Others, typically "self-clinching", are installed with arbor presses and some degree of attention by the operator to maintain ...


2

The methods available to a hobbyist are akin to that of the production world, in that one needs only a controlled heated implement traveling in a restricted manner. A drill press with a long bolt threaded to match the insert provides such restrictions. Heat can be applied to the insert and the quill lowered into the part, which is secured appropriately to ...


2

Dislocations travel through a metal crystal while it is being deformed; it is in fact dislocation movement which makes metal crystals yield and deform at loads far below that which you could calculate on the basis of interatomic forces in a perfect lattice. These mobile dislocations tend to pile up against one another and become entangled as the material ...


2

That is just clearance between the Cotter and the Socket/Spigot. The Cotter pushes only one one side of the slot that it is fitted into, so there should be clearance on the opposite side to ensure this. "D" = the last two digits of the roll number, as shown at the bottom right. The image below is taken from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sUjb-...


1

correct me if, with dimensions. You have a cantilevered tab with a thickness of 0.375" and 1.5" width and 3" length with 2 inches deflection. so the tab is bent by an angle $\alpha=41.8$ The force must be smaller than section plastic hinge moment, $$F > \sigma Y* M_{P \ of \ tab}*3"cos41.8$$ $$ M_{P \ of \ tab}= b \frac{H^2}{4}= 1.5\frac{ ...


1

Figure 1. Clamping point. On the webpage you linked it appears that they hold the device on the 8 mm diameter rod sticking out the bottom. (Look at the press-mounted device.) To mount on an aluminium plate and have the back of the instrument in contact with the plate you just need a block of aluminium, steel, plastic, etc., and drill an 8 mm hole 11 mm from ...


1

You need to add a spring-loaded deploying tool hinged to the end of your horizontal conveyer, as per the figure. The spring is calibrated to settle under the weight of the cylinder to allow it to slide down and lodge into the vertical bracket, but once empty it will rise up nudging the cylinder tucked in place. .


1

The pitch line velocities (tangent velocity at the pitch diameter) are the same for both gears in mesh. If they weren't you would have the tooth of one gear traveling through the tooth of the other gear. At the point of contact the pitch line velocities and the forces exerted are equal, thus you have no change in power. As for the derivation of your ...


1

From what I see, in order to measure the torque you should have put the side view. See below and imagine that the blue line around the face is the rope. From that view its possible to see if your calculation about the correct axis of rotation is obtained. More specifically, you are interested in the rotation about the x-axis (as it is drawn in the image ...


1

Rotary screw and scroll , neither uses centrifugal force. Sullair Co. makes both and other types of compressors . Their website should have more information.


1

It really depends on what your application requires. Sometimes the optimal layout isn't feasible so you have to use what is. But here are some general rules of thumb to add on to NMech's answer: Typical maximum ratio is 5:1 or less for parallel axis spur gears. If your gear radius of curvature is significantly greater than your pinion, you'll have ...


1

First of all, there will be two deflection equations, because the stiffness is not uniform. I'm getting the impression you somehow tried to use a single equation for the whole beam, which would obviously fail. The basic equation for cantilever beam you posted seems correct. Now for the left part you can use that as is, substituting the total length (L1+L2) ...


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