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The quench all depends on the grade of steel that you are working with. Each steel is specially formulated to be used for a specific type of application. As others have stated you need to narrow down your material then investigate from that point. I don't know how anyone could answer this vague of a question with any accuracy. The following list gives a ...


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The wavelength of the light with the dissociation energy of epoxy phenyl oxygen is 300-310 nm. Over time, when exposed to this wavelength, it will become opaque and yellow. The solution is simple: add a layer which absorbs strongly the UVa (it has a high absorptivity in these wavelengths), like oxanilidies, and this will inhibit the opaque degradation.


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Hi to the next person to read this, The preceding appears to be all correct, however, it appears to be for a solid composite beam. If you are using a USB board as a core, you must rather do composite beam calculations. I landed on this post because I wanted to refresh my memory to calculate composite beams for a snow yatch I am building (like an iceboat ...


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Hurstwic has been doing some interesting work with basic iron/steel smelting. Not an answer to your question, but, Yes, you can smelt your own Iron/Steel at home with relative safety (your mileage may vary). You'd have to figure out what additional properties you'd need to add in the smelt, and the refinement work would take additional research, but it's ...


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Yes, it will warp. Imagine the blue layer material stiffer, with higher Young modulus E and shear modulus G and the white material as less stiff. The blue material will be the dominant material in reacting to the torsion and will warp in developing both St Venanat shear stresses and warping stress which are axial tensile and compressive stresses and ...


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