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It would certainly be possible to make a machine like you are proposing, but there are good reasons why hydraulics aren't usually the optimal choice. There are exceptions to this, for example CNC press brakes for metals or CNC mandrel benders often have hydraulic actuators. The distinction is that usually the down sides of hydraulic positioning are only ...


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Consider that the torque converter in an automatic transmission is explicitly designed to support this scenario. Whereas, a limited-slip differential is designed to handle the opposite scenario, where insufficient load is encountered (on one of the drive shafts). Every motor can be protected from overload conditions in a motor-appropriate way. Apparently, ...


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There can be another case: if the motor is expected to stall time to time or experience an overload condition as a part of its routine, motor shaft can be equipped with a ball detent torque limiter instead of a fixed gear. That way, the motor can keep spinning in idle mode without notable damage while its working piece is blocked-by.


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It depends on the specific type of motor, as @nielsnelson mentions, but it also depends on what you use to drive the motor. In general, a motor that's designed to run continuously isn't going to take well to being stalled for any length of time, unless its drive voltage (and frequency, if it's an induction or synchronous machine) is reduced. There are ...


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The answer depends on the specific type of motor you intend to use, but in general: when a motor is loaded down, it draws more current, which means its windings get hotter at the same time that the cooling fan attached to the motor shaft is being slowed down. if this heat is allowed to build up, it will eventually cause the insulation on the windings to fail ...


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The fan starts to act like a resistor and soon will heat excessively, till the breaker cuts the power off. Almost all of the electrical motors have built-in fuses and breakers which will act to protect them. Combustion engines usually are tougher and if the torque demand increases beyond theire output they just stop cranking and you need to reignite them. ...


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