4

This is actually something not easily answered because it is part of the definition of pressure. I will instead point you to other answers which hopefully make sense. The following is an excerpt from Lumen Physics. *The force exerted on the end of the tank is perpendicular to its inside surface. This direction is because the force is exerted by a static or ...


3

Since the density for the both the cases are different. The density of mercury will remain the same. The density of the air will vary with pressure and that's exactly what you want to measure. The air pressure pushes the mercury up the tube and, since the top of the tube is a vacuum, there is no counter-pressure. Mercury has a density of 13.6 g/cm3. 1 ...


2

I'll give you a hint, use the conversation of linear momentum equation. For a fixed control volume $CV$: $$ \sum \vec{F} = \frac{d}{dt} \int_{CV} \rho \vec{V} dV + \int_{CS} \rho \vec{V}(\vec{V}_r . \vec{n}) dA$$ wher $\vec{V}_r = \vec{V} - \vec{V}_{CS}$ is the relative flow velocity exiting the control volume relative to the control surface. Assuming a ...


1

From the inside of the flak the pressure is $P_0+ hg\rho$. If you are looking for the force that secrets force on the base then that force is $(P_0+ hg\rho- P_0 )A$.


1

Most labs have a mercury barometer in them to give the atmospheric pressure. Usually taken at the start and end of a test - especially when dealing with engines, also ambient temperature and humidity are taken as well. The "lab standard" mercury barometers also have a temperature correction chart to correct the indicated reading due to the ...


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