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7

This is not a definitve answer, but since I went to the trouble to look it up I thought i might as well post what I found: Pretty sure there's no onboard pump As you can see this is a normal firehose, not a suction hose with reinforcing spirals. this is relevant because it means water has to be supplied to Colossus at pressure, from a fire engine with a ...


5

Fire retardant fillers are pretty cheap; often cheaper than the base plastic (Alumina Trihydrate for example). Like anything in engineering though, there are always exceptions and functional reasons why something is never the solution 100% of the time. Here are some instances where I think fire retardant fillers would not be preferred: Filler Capacity - A ...


4

Year's ago I took out the inside of my Zippo and closed the top, then slid a tight piece of heat shrink over the lighter case. Heated it till the heat shrink was tight the took a Razer knife and cut along 3 side's leaving the hinged area in contact. Refilled the cartridge with fluid put back in the lighter lasted a lot longer on one fill up plus it was ...


4

The big issue is that Zippos aren't that well sealed, especially the lid which allows fuels to evaporate through the wick and it's this wick to air interface which is the most critical thing as the whole function of the wick is to provide a big surface area for fuel to evaporate and thus burn. Given that the fill level probably doesn't make a big ...


4

Higher temperature definitely increases evaporation rate. Keeping it away from body heat and not letting it heat up a lot from flame will keep the fuel from evaporating too fast. Other than that, concentration gradient - a seal will reduce the evaporation around the container; won't stop evaporation through the wick. Also, it may make opening it for ...


4

Using explosives to blow out oil well fires was first used in 1913 and is still a widely used method for extinguishing such fires, which are isolated point source fires. The principle behind this method is the blast from the detonated explosives momentarily forces burning fuel and oxygen away from the fire, thus starving the fire of both fuel and oxygen ...


2

Source 1 - Polysulfone (PSU) Plastic has one of the highest service temperatures among all melt-processable thermoplastics, combined with high-temperature resistance and inherent flame retardance. PSU is tough and stable at high temperatures, and actually shares a lot of the same traits as polycarbonate plastic. These fundamental traits make PSU used for ...


2

If the problem were to just make a box that itself did not burn in an housefire, that seems trivial and somewhat useless - 100 cm cube of brick that holds 0 (pick your volumetric units) contents If the goal is to protect the contents from a fire you have to understand that many items one wants to protect would deterioriate with heat. Even the best insulation ...


2

First, you need a better specification than "fireproof." Is the objective to build a box that survives a flame for a certain time? Is it to protect the contents? Does the box need to keep people out or things in? Be specific. Fireproof items will be typically built with some type of clay-ish fire brick. Depending on how long and how hot the ...


2

They protect the combustible framing by cladding it in fire-resistant materials like gypsum boards. Fire code is an integrated and elaborate part of the building code. It assigns fire protection requirements and demands fire ratings of structure and its contents depending on the usage and location of the building. It sets standards for access and egress and ...


2

It turns out there's indeed a product that uses explosives against forst fires: The system 2RS (After the developers, Chief Firefighter Dipl. Ing. Ries and explosives technician Rosenstock. The S probably means Schlauch) constists of a firehose with a detonative cord along it's length. The idea is to roll the hose paralell to the flamefron, fill it with ...


1

There is a specific temperature range that causes calcination of limestone. $$\text{CaCO}_3 + \text{Heat} = \text{CaO} + \text{CO}_2$$ The temperature range of reaction is 840°C-900°C and is used for creating cement in a kiln. Adding oxygen and sulphur dioxide causes limestone to become gypsum... which is structurally significantly weaker than limestone ...


1

Concrete can be significantly damaged at 600F but specifics are highly variable according to the Portland Cement association. It depends on the ratio of cement to aggregate , sizes of aggregate, composition of the aggregate, heating/cooling rate, duration, etc. Specific information on sandstone and limestone is even more difficult to find. Rock can even ...


1

Radiative heat transfer will be quite high in a house fire, so not every construction made for 100°C temperature differences will be applicable here- look for constructions that have glowing-metal temperatures to contain (ceramics ovens...), and reverse the design to work for heat applied from the outside. Also put something with high heat capacity (water is ...


1

No, the flame can't go upstream back into the can and explode what is in the can. This is no different than the flame in your gas stove can't go back up the pipe and explode the whole distribution network. Fire is a chemical reaction between fuel and oxygen. There can't be fire in the nozzle or in the can because there is no oxygen there.


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