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At the very high level you will need 24V Power supply or a method to generate 24V 24V Motor controller Microcontroller - Arduino is a good place to start There are also prebuild motor controllers that can be programed via computer. These tend to be expensive. I would suggest following web sites similar to the ones listed below. They tend to have blogs, ...


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Microprocessors. The measured value from a sensor (either an analog voltage or any other digital processed value) provides the microprocessor with the current output of the system. Internally, this has stored the desired setpoint, and computes the next control input by indeed taking the difference of the output and the setpoint using any kind of arithmetric ...


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Based on the information you've given, I believe your professor is suggesting that a friction term can be represented as shown in the following block diagram. The transfer function $G(s)$ relates force ($F(s)$, the input in the diagram) to velocity ($sX(s)$, the output in the diagram) for a mass-spring system. The damping ($\rho$) is represented in the ...


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The final value theorem is for a signal, not a transfer function. Use the transfer function to express the output signal $$ V_{\mathrm{out}}(s) = \frac{1}{RCs+1} V_{\mathrm{in}}(s),$$ with input $V_{\mathrm{in}}(s)$. Now, I assume that your input signal is a step-function $$ v_{\mathrm{in}}(t) = \begin{cases}0, \; \mathrm{for} \; t < 0 \\ 10, \; \mathrm{...


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Let's start by obtaining the state space form of the closed-loop system (closed loop means that you plug in the equations the expression of the controller). The controller of this specific system has the following form: $$ u = -Kx+r $$ This is a full state feedback controller with feedforward gain of $1$ (feedforward is the gain by which the input signal is ...


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Adding to the other answers. I just so happen to have done exactly this. I used a windshield wiper motor and a potentiometer but the principal is the same. Here's my arduino source code: https://pastebin.com/0ezsmi4y And a short video I took of it in action. This is an alternate version that takes RC PWM input instead of serial. I think all the talk about ...


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You are at the right track. As the DC motor is rather fast for a potential slow microcontroller, using a discrete controller will improve the reliability and stability of the closed-loop system. Even though a DC motor is rather easy to model (speaking of the basic dynamics upto the 3rd order), using system identification can improve parameter estimation ...


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The System Identification Toolbox app is indeed the solution, but I can understand the amount of choices and options make it rather confusing at first. Especially if you have no prior knowledge to model identification. If you are going to use a PID controller, I simply suggest you perform a frequency identification on the system (as this estimates a transfer ...


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I would think that this refers to using mathematical and physical principles and equations to predict the behaviour of a control system. The opposite would be to empirically design a control system, by implementing it and measuring it.


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Suppose we have a system $G(s) = \frac{1}{s(s+1)}$ and controller $K$ (this is purely a gain) and we close the loop: $$T(s) = \frac{KG(s)}{1+KG(s)} = \frac{K\frac{1}{s(s+1)}}{1+K\frac{1}{s(s+1)}}$$ $$ = \frac{K}{s^2+s+K} $$ As you might notice, the poles of this closed-loop equation depend on the value of $K$: $$s^2 + s + K = 0 \rightarrow s = -0.5\pm\sqrt{0....


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your question is ill-conditioned: If $A$ must have a higher degree than $B$, 2 things can happen: $A$ is a constant, meaning $B$ must be 0: which means you cannot solve the equation as there is no $s$ term in $A(s)(s^2-1)$. Or $A$ is of order one (atleast one $s$) and $B$ is a constant: Which means the function can not be solved as there will be a $s^3$ ...


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First, find the energy balance - basically mass flow x thermal capacity x delta T is the same on both sides. Edit to add There's an error in your energy balance: on the left hand side it's simply $\Delta T$, not the derivative. Also make sure to use the correct values for $c$ as you have two different media. Then, find something like this for your valve: ...


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You can see how to obtain the transfer function of the mass spring system in many well documented links, e.g.: Xengineer 10 min youtube video Youtube Ryan Krauss Series 1, 2 - z, $\omega$, 3 - TFs, 4 - Damping, ... Having said that I couldn't understand what you meant by "it is possible to see the the friction in a mass-friction-spring as the ...


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