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At the very high level you will need 24V Power supply or a method to generate 24V 24V Motor controller Microcontroller - Arduino is a good place to start There are also prebuild motor controllers that can be programed via computer. These tend to be expensive. I would suggest following web sites similar to the ones listed below. They tend to have blogs, ...


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Microprocessors. The measured value from a sensor (either an analog voltage or any other digital processed value) provides the microprocessor with the current output of the system. Internally, this has stored the desired setpoint, and computes the next control input by indeed taking the difference of the output and the setpoint using any kind of arithmetric ...


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Adding to the other answers. I just so happen to have done exactly this. I used a windshield wiper motor and a potentiometer but the principal is the same. Here's my arduino source code: https://pastebin.com/0ezsmi4y And a short video I took of it in action. This is an alternate version that takes RC PWM input instead of serial. I think all the talk about ...


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You are at the right track. As the DC motor is rather fast for a potential slow microcontroller, using a discrete controller will improve the reliability and stability of the closed-loop system. Even though a DC motor is rather easy to model (speaking of the basic dynamics upto the 3rd order), using system identification can improve parameter estimation ...


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I would think that this refers to using mathematical and physical principles and equations to predict the behaviour of a control system. The opposite would be to empirically design a control system, by implementing it and measuring it.


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Suppose we have a system $G(s) = \frac{1}{s(s+1)}$ and controller $K$ (this is purely a gain) and we close the loop: $$T(s) = \frac{KG(s)}{1+KG(s)} = \frac{K\frac{1}{s(s+1)}}{1+K\frac{1}{s(s+1)}}$$ $$ = \frac{K}{s^2+s+K} $$ As you might notice, the poles of this closed-loop equation depend on the value of $K$: $$s^2 + s + K = 0 \rightarrow s = -0.5\pm\sqrt{0....


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your question is ill-conditioned: If $A$ must have a higher degree than $B$, 2 things can happen: $A$ is a constant, meaning $B$ must be 0: which means you cannot solve the equation as there is no $s$ term in $A(s)(s^2-1)$. Or $A$ is of order one (atleast one $s$) and $B$ is a constant: Which means the function can not be solved as there will be a $s^3$ ...


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