Hot answers tagged

1

Can you not simply take the miles per gallon value times the Heating Value of the fuel?


1

Tip: 'KW' is a kelvin-watt (which I don't think is useful for anything). Use 'kW' for kilowatt. (Capitals matter!) You could really simplify the problem by using the energy density of the fuel. If you look it up you should find that it's about 10 kWh/kg of petrol or diesel. 10 kWh/kg × 3600 s/h = 36000 kWs/kg = 36000 kJ/kg = 36 MJ/kg. My diesel VW does about ...


1

I think this will lead to an overestimation because you are assuming the load is 100% during the whole time (I would expect it to be somewhere 40 and 50% on average). Assuming 35 MJ/lt, your calculation as it is would yield about 15 lit per 100 km, which is a too much. Given the average ratio of load, it would yield something between 7.5 and 6 lit per 100 km ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible