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You are describing what is called a gravity battery. See link here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravity_battery Short answer no, and the simplest way to understand it is that you can never create energy, you can harvest it, store it, and use it, change its form, but never create it. This is called the law of conservation of energy: https://en.wikipedia.org/...


4

I would like to answer this question slightly differently. The challenge with rechargeable batteries (Lithium Ion), each charge discharge cycle causes internal resistance of the battery to increase. This causes the usable life of the battery to decrease. Therefore if the rise internal resistance over time is decreased or fully resolved then the Lithium Ion ...


2

Would the energy generated from the falling rock be far greater than what is feeled when lifting AND would that be a viable source of energy, theoretically (Provided it can be store efficiently)? Lifting a heavy rock with a pulley system would make it 'feel' much lighter, and could also be more efficient than trying to lift it directly. However the energy ...


2

I'll approach your question from another perspective. This is a very simplistic calculation, but it will serve to make a point. The following graph presents the cost and gravitational density of Lithium ion batteries. The data is up to 2013. Let's assume for argument sake that we are at 300 Wh/kg. Let's take the US residential energy consumption 11$\left[\...


1

If you are thinking about "free" energy, then that's definitely not a way to achieve it. Although with some types of pulleys you might get half, 1/3, or even less force than the weight you are pulling, you'd be needing to pull the rope, twice, 3 or ever more times. Basically the work is constant to raise a mass at height h, and its $$W = m \cdot g \...


1

I'm thinking about using a pulley system that would allow heavy loads (e.g. a rock) to be lifted with fair ease with the intended goal of harvesting the load's falling energy. You seem to have forgotten that while the force required to lift the mass is halved by the pulley that the distance the rope has to be pulled has been doubled because of the same ...


1

Remember that in a car, a lead-acid battery is subjected to routine temperature excursions from -20F to +140F under the hood, and this does not ruin the battery. The critical issue with long-term storage of lead-acid batteries is not temperature cycling but something else called self-discharge, in which the battery gradually loses it charge state and becomes ...


1

This question cannot be answered as it is (without numerical values). The main reason is that you need to determine the pressure Losses due to the pipe length. However the pressure losses are dependent on the type of flow (Laminar or turbulent), which will be dependent on the actual velocity and the roughness in the pipe. Having said the above, the process ...


1

The classic cleaner for removing corrosion products is a mild acid at elevated temperature. For contacts made of steel or chrome-plated steel, warm phosphoric acid works very well. This is an ingredient used in popular "rust remover" products you can buy in hardware stores. If you use anything like this, it is imperative that you take great care to ...


1

I have restored several outdoor devices, including a garage door opener this way: Start with hot water, and something gentle, like a toothbrush. The hot water can help solubility compared to alcohol or even cold water. Alcohol (isopropyl, 90%+ ideally) is still good as a final step. Obviously unplug/remove batteries, and if electronics gets wet, make sure to ...


1

The listing in the provided link is a summary of generally accepted sources of power for EV charging systems. Your question appears to be what is allowed by those sources, which really is not related to EV charging. Modes 1 and 2 indicate the use of a domestic socket. The power allowed is limited by the wiring, circuit breakers and for Mode 2, additional ...


1

On a 230 V system 16 A would be the circuit breaker rating for one circuit with a couple of sockets on it. A typical cooker would be 35 A. In Ireland the traditional connection is single-phase 63 A. A quick web check says that the Nissan Leaf has a 40 kWh battery. Charging at your < 4 kW rating would mean an 11 hour charge, allowing for some losses. I don'...


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