8

Works similarly in the US (compared to UK responses). Natural monopolies are allowed to exist for utilities as it wouldn't make sense to have 3 or 4 different sewer lines running to everyone's home. The distribution company that owns the grid may or may not produce electricity itself. But there is (usually) only one power line that connects to a user.


6

In the UK there are three different parts of the complete system: generation, transmission and distribution, and supply (sales) to customers. There are many companies that generate electricity, varying in size from national (and even international) companies down to small organizations that operate a few wind turbines at one location. There are two parts ...


4

We really need more info on the batteries and type of connection. Will the connection be permanent? In that case soldering or welding are the best choices. If you're connecting to wire, you'll need good strain relief. Any repetitive motion at the solder joint / weld will cause failure eventually. In a vehicle the battery may have a tendency to jostle around....


4

New homes are inspected by local authorities to comply with local building requlations. As Mike says, give them a call. The National Electrical Code (NEC) are standardized guidelines for electrical construction created by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). The NEC are guidelines, not laws. The NEC is adopted into law by states and local ...


3

Ever since 1975 use of at least one GFCI outlet and preferably more is mandatory in bathrooms or anywhere where there is the likelihood of moisture being near the outlet by NEC (National Electric Code). If you have only one GFCI in any bathroom, all other outlets in that bathroom must be downstream to that GFCI and controlled by it. You can ask your local ...


3

The reason for the humming noise is improper grounding. Audio signals are low voltage level AC signals (over simplified). An audio signal could be for example 1V, 1 KHz signal. When there is improper grounding, a low level noise signal example 10mV 50Hz can get coupled to the audio signal causing humming. (Values are made up) I would suggest installing ...


2

That long audio cable is acting like an aerial. Does it run close to any mains wires - in the wall perhaps? You will be better off getting a quality shielded audio cable as a first step. If that does not work then you have to consider some filtering.


2

For whatever reason standards bodies seem to prefer to give a tabulated list of values without giving any rationale to how those figures were obtained. I once tried to do some first-principles reasoning on this. Let $S$ be the surface area per unit length of the cable, $R$ be the resistance per unit length of the cable, $P$ be the power that can be safely ...


2

There are tables by various standards authorities which give current ratings for various wire gauges based on their insulation, bundling, free-air, conduit, etc. If you find one of those and plot the data you can generate your own best-fit curve. You might be able to get it down to a quadratic equation for a certain range of wire sizes.


2

Try this. Figure 1. A simple snubber indicator. Pressing SW1 will pass a current through L1. D1 will be reverse biased and LAMP1 will remain off. Releasing SW1 will cause L1's top terminal to switch to a negative voltage, D1 will become forward biased and current will flow through the lamp. You can estimate the pulse duration time constant from $ \tau = ...


1

In the UK the grid is owned by one entity and power suppy companies sell to customers in the areas they service. The power companies may or may not be generating power... In fact, EDF is one company that sells in the UK and it is based in France. This causes price choices so customers can shop around for the best deal for their needs.


1

To figure this out, you must need to identify the type of grounding is adopeted on the 2o side of the transformer. Usually the center of WYE is directly grounding and so is the neutral. Said that, you should measure 230 V between any phase to neutral. By now, it seems like the transformer has an isolation problem on its windings (my guess).


1

A portion of your question contains a portion of the answer. Your squirrel cage motor example is connected to line power, while the typical Tesla motor is not connected to line power. According to a Tesla web page, speed is controlled by both the voltage of the provided electricity and by varying the frequency: Unlike the DC brushless rotor, the induction ...


1

I would see what variable resistors were available and using those ranges do a spreadsheet to calculate results of cycling through the resistor range with known values for L and C. Then you can decide input voltage etc - will they be able to touch it? Safety?? 12V or 120V or 1200V?


1

While charging the capacitor the electrons are forcefully jammed inside, working against the Coulomb force that is trying to push them out (opposite charges attract, same ones try to separate). As E=F*s you get the stored energy as from the force that is trying to push the electrons out, times the distance that they have been pushed against this force. This ...


1

You can model a capacitor as if it were a spring. Squeezing the spring to make it deflect is the same as pushing current into a capacitor to charge it up; both require work to be done. The squeezed spring contains an amount of stored energy equal to the work expended to squeeze it, and in the case of the capacitor the energy stored in it equals the work ...


1

As mentioned the cable is acting like an aerial. A ferrite core to wrap the cable around a couple of times might help. The comm to the charger comm is grounding it with less resistance as the other answer said.


1

Are you making a corrosion sensor or a hydrogen sensor ? Corrosion sensors ( corrosion probes) ,based on metal loss have been around for over 50 years. And hydrogen is a special problem , strongly dependent on the diffusion of the hydrogen. Steel is relatively "transparent" to hydrogen above 400 F. And the solubility below 400 F depends on the steel ...


1

In the UK, the grid is divided into the transmission network (high voltage; long distance) and the distribution networks (lower voltage networks; connects directly to the consumer and small generators). The transmission network is owned by National Grid (in England and Wales) and the distribution networks are owned by a different companies that operate in ...


1

I doubt there is any place where the provision of electricity is completely privatized. Take California, for example. There's Pacific Gas & Electric, which is a corporation that is owned by stockholders. (The terms "public" and "private" get confusing here; since the stock is publicly traded, it's a "public" company, but since it is owned by individuals ...


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