15

One is training to be an engineer and one is training to be a technician. The best way to see the differences are to look at the course curriculum for each: Purdue BS EE Plan of Study Purdue BS EET Plan of Study Purdue BS ME Plan of Study Purdue BS MET Plan of Study both are able to become PEs This depends on your local rules for becoming a PE. Also ...


15

In my civil engineering degree we used ODEs for the relationship between force, moment and deflection. I don't remember using PDEs myself, but my brother-in-law (doing civils at a different university) used them for hydraulics. In real life (as a bridge designer) I can't remember actually using calculus. University mainly concentrated on the theory and the ...


11

I originally wrote this as a comment attached to AndyT's answer but in response to dcorking's comment I've decided to expand here. I graduated nearly 30 years and my experience is similar to AndyT's. After graduating I went straight into industry. Since graduating, I and everyone I have worked with or been associated with have never used and have never ...


10

A little background (honest disclosure). I started out getting my B.S./M.S. in Mech Eng. from a fairly practical/applied school before deciding to continue with a PhD at a more theoretical school. As a result, I don't claim to be a real engineer (my general experience is that academics working in engineering are usually mediocre engineers), but I've got a ...


8

This is from the view of a civil engineer. Engineers typically don't use higher level math because the code specifications are written specifically to avoid the need. You don't want a building or bridge to fail because an engineer didn't take an integral correctly. Wherever possible, the hard math has been reduced to a simplified equation, a chart or a ...


7

I agree, as discussed in a few of the other answers, that most of the time engineers do not directly use calculus (or other advanced math) very often in order to do their day to day job. And at the same time, having an understanding of it is vital for a good engineer. I would add, though, that understanding advanced mathematics well enough to use it ...


7

Depending on how you look at it, none and all of it. The cycle of doing something the hard way, learning a short cut and then moving on to advanced material repeats all the way through college. For example once I started taking Algebra, I stopped doing multiplication tables. College level math is the same way. After calculus most engineers take ...


6

I'm not sure of the specifics of your problem, it seems to be relatively straightforward to me. I have previoulsy considered addressing the subject of measurement errors with schoolchildren in the following manner - it may be of help to you and your audience or change in subject may confuse and distract them from your topic, that's up to you to decide. Step ...


6

Disclaimer: I've studied control theory from a mathematics perspective, not an engineer's perspective. Classical Control Theory is based on linear systems and is also limited to them as well. Linearization is helpful in many cases, but not entirely applicable in others. Analysis tools (laplace transform, pole placement, root locus, routh hurwitz, etc...) ...


5

I went with my daughter's class to the science museum and while we were looking at things, I commented on why it worked that way and gave occasional interpretation of the displays. Impressed, my daughter's friend said, “Gee, Are you some sort of scientist of something?” The answer I had ready was “No, something better. I am an engineer. Scientists only ...


5

An electronics engineer here, who found the maths the most difficult part of his degree. I quite routinely have to use and manipulate complex numbers when doing RF engineering, circuit modelling and design. They have also been useful when modelling ultrasonic propagation. I have often wished that Excel handled complex numbers as a built-in type. An ...


5

The experiment can be done during daylight but you need a very tall building overlooking the ocean & having an uninterrupted view of the horizon. This video show a group of US students doing the experiment You Tube - Measuring the Radius of the Earth To get an accurate measurement you will need: to be able to view the horizon unimpeded have reasonably ...


4

IMHO Engineering Technology degrees focus on Application engineering whereas engineering degrees are very scientific based. A review of the web links from @JedF support this fact Purdue BS EE Plan of Study Purdue BS EET Plan of Study A quick compare of the above two curriculum's indicate the inclusion of course like Product and Program Management in EET ...


4

As a computational scientist, i work closely with engineers developing the software tools they use to solve different kinds of engineering problems. My work relies heavily on partial differential equations and numerical analysis, for which integrals, derivatives, taylor series, limits, green's theorem, optimization, rates of change, etc... are all the basic ...


4

Does the book not give you the mathematics? The underlying expression is: $$parameter = 1-e^{ -t/ \tau }$$ so you see at $t = \tau$ $$parameter = 1 - e^{-1} = 0.63$$ Now the second sentence says divide "change to be completed" which is $1 -parameter$ , or $e^{-t/\tau}$, by the first derivative: $$\frac{d parameter}{dt} = \frac{e^{-t/\tau}}{\tau}$$ so ...


3

First, designing a shoe absolutely is engineering. Second, there is no simple way to measure the "goodness" of a shoe. If there were, there'd be only one model of shoe out there. You therefore have to define a set of criteria to which the shoes will be measured. This lets the kids know what to aim at, and you a way of scoring their results. You could ...


3

Designing a shoe is as much of a engineering task as doing anything else. Just because there are all sorts of other designers nowadays does not mean that shoes are not engineering worthy. Optimization makes nearly any task engineering worthy. Simple one dimensional goal such as weight, cost etc is easy to score. Engineering is not just about easy ...


3

Try asking the IOM3 & other accrediting institutions why the courses you are interested in are not accredited and if there is a possibility that they could be accredited in the near future. The courses may not cover material that such institutions consider vital for professionals engaged in that field and which would be required for membership of the ...


3

I have a bachelor's in computer engineering. I'm still early in my career (currently mostly software, but I'm trying to get more involved in the hardware aspect of things), but here's my experience: I was wondering what kind of calculus do you real engineers use? The single most-used topic for me both in school and elsewhere was the Fourier transform. It ...


3

I'll give an example of calculus that I used today as a Software Engineer. We were estimating the computational time of performing an operation on each of many groups of elements. The time taken for an individual group is proportional to the size of the group squared. We're not sure of the distribution of the sizes of the groups, but depending on different ...


2

This is written from the point of view of someone getting a PhD in mechanical engineering. My math background is somewhat comparable to (but definitely inferior to) that of PhD students in an applied math program. As other have indicated, the answer to this question depends greatly on the particular engineer's work. In many cases, advanced math is genuinely ...


2

Doing piping layout for a new chemical processes utilizes 3D modeling software a lot of the time now. I would think trying to show how pipes can and can't physically be laid out could use those concepts. A typical situation is that one large pipe starts from a source somewhere, and a number of smaller pipes branch from the large pipe and can run in any ...


2

Some of the difference is that some other courses have a lot of individual reading time and engineers get more class / lab / experiment time - which also means that the Uni needs expensive equipment that needs to be maintained. My Uni had sub & supersonic wind tunnels , water flow stuff axial and radial, water channel etc etc Engineering courses are ...


1

While nothing in the real world truly has zero damping, a good example, though it doesn't use a coil spring would be a tuned mass vibration absorber. "Tuned Dynamic Vibration Absorber" It's basically a mass attached to a motor, or another vibrating object by a stiff rod. By varying the amount of mass and the stiffness of the rod, the absorber can be "...


1

According to the course "The Mechatronics Revolution: Fundamentals and Core Concepts" from Georgia Tech: Robotics is a large multidisciplinary field including topics such as Computer Vision Path Planning Mechanical Design Controls Dynamics Human Robot Interface Mechatronics Mechatronics could be viewed as a component of robotics, an ...


1

I don't think that they are fundamentally that different. Possibly mechatronics would lean more towards industrial automation in a process and manufacturing type context whereas robotics implies more of an experimental and product design type approach ie robotics is product and mechatronics is plant. Similarly robotics tends to imply a more self contained ...


1

Mechatronics is a reaction to the fact that one can not design good next gen products without knowing both the electronical and mechanical realms. Having kickass electronics can not overcome a bad mechanical design. Conversely a badly done electrical system can not control the mechanical part so that you gain benefits over traditional mechanical engineering. ...


1

They look them up in books, articles, standards, catalogues or they observe their surroundings. Mechanical engineering has been around for a while so many of the problems are known; Looking up a existing solution is quite feasible. For example back when i was teaching mechanism design, many of my exercises were from things that one could be observed at the ...


1

Curriculum differs between universities Engineering curriculum differs between countries Curricula are updated regularly to meet new accreditation requirements Sometimes there is a distinct difference between graduate and undergraduate programs from the same school Some professors are progressive and update courses more frequently to keep up with advances ...


1

The answers all generally make valid points but I think they miss the real reason engineers take a pretty standard 2 year math curriculum: efficiency in learning the rest of their coursework. The people that devised the original curricula were not interested in creating a "liberal arts" foundation where calculus would exercise your mind etc. They wanted to ...


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