7

99.5% pure tungsten? A lot depends on what the last 0.5% is. Ductile tungsten is made by adding a small amount of rhenium, for example. That makes it much more machinable, and improves your chances of drilling a hole. Even then - a 0.1 mm hole is extremely small, and I would not try to make a hole like that mechanically. You can try electrochemical ...


6

What you are looking for is called a reamer. Some 10mm reamers: http://www.aliexpress.com/item/Free-shipping-cnc-nc-2015-Reamer-10-0-X30X75L-High-speed-reamer-high-degree-of-finish/32244988192.html http://www.aliexpress.com/item/Square-End-10mm-Cutting-Diameter-6-Flutes-HSS-Hand-Reamer-Milling-Cutter/32240625696.html http://www.aliexpress.com/item/Free-...


5

I am afraid that drilling tungsten will be very tough with any available drill bit. You could also consider laser machining (in my country, there is at least one company offering even small batches with a very affordable price, comparable to the price of a single 0.1 mm drill bit - which you would almost certainly trash anyway). Or, you could build your ...


4

You really need to use a dial indicator to set up a 4 jaw chuck to the sort of accuracy required for this job. This is fiddly compared to a self centering chuck but has the potential to give you better accuracy for equivalent quality parts. Similarly you need to make sure that the part you are drilling is faced off as square as possible in the chuck and ...


3

They short answer is that they aren't. Exact sizes will, of course depend on manufacturing tolerances but 0.2mm is a lot undersized by normal standards, although for jobber drills this won't actually matter much. For example metric tap drill sizes are generally specified to at least 0.1mm One possible explanation for measuring drills as undersized is ...


3

There are cutters that produce circular, slightly tapered plugs, typically 4-12mm diameter. Tapered plug cutter Used in a rigid drill press or milling machine with slow feeds and plenty of lubricant these can cut plugs from soft metals as well as wood and plastic.


3

If you use a washer under the head of the flat head wood screw, get you a cup washer. these are intended to let you use flat head screws as if they were pan heads. They hold the wedge profile of the flat head screw up and out of contact with the wood so it will not split the wood as you screw it in, and they hide the sharp rim of the screw head so it will ...


3

It seems reasonable to believe that the flat head (countersunk) screw would apply enough force to split the wood, hence the restriction. If you use a flat head screw and the washer prevents the countersunk portion from exerting wedge-type force on the wood, you will have accomplished the objective. Consider also that if you use a fender washer (large ...


3

Take this all as very general....Flutes of a drill bit are ground only for chip extraction, where as end mills take the chip extraction flute and grind an actual cutting edge on it ( b - c ) and some relief (c - d). Picture is of a 4 flute end mill, the one on the left being proper. There's MUCH much more to cutting tool geometry than this brief explanation, ...


3

I would rethink your design. The cost and difficulty of producing your component with a conventional machine setup is likely outside your range of expectations. I suggest the following approach to create a micro orifice. Instead of a conventional printer nozzle, consider using a thin piece of sheet material, perhaps 1mm thick, which has been drilled by a ...


3

Actually they have a machine call fine hole machine or call Superdrill machine in the market, and use a type of copper tubing with diameter 0.08mm. Or, can use copper tube 0.08mmm as electrode, machining using electrode discharge machine (EDM).


2

This article Suggests that M1 tapers are standard but there are examples with Jarno tapers. Your measurements seem closest to Jarno #4 but don't match exactly This page has tables of the common taper sizes so you may be able to deduce it from there.


2

There is an instability (wobbliness) caused by uneven chuck jaws in my G0768 lathe. I read online about it and was able to correct it by incrementally inserting standard paper pieces until the chuck was aligned enough. (OTOH, the spindle is perfectly aligned it seems, by eye - can't see any movement in it). So doing that I was able to drill a 0.25mm hole ...


2

It depends a but what you mean by M7 size. Specifying M7 rather than 7 mm diameter implies that the hole is threaded. If this is the case you are better off with a bit of M7 threaded rod cut to length. The best material will depend on the application aluminium male threads are rare but do exist. In most cases stainless should be ok. If you do use a metal ...


2

There are a number of online reference. I entered "dictionary oil terms" into a search engine & came up with these as an example: The Schlumberger Oilfield Glossary Glossary of Oil and Gas Terms - Bruin Glossary of Oil and Natural Gas Terms Oil and Gas Glossary of Terms for Production Financing OPIS Glossary of Terms Oil & Gas Dictionary of ...


2

It's called engineering design. The drill steels are designed to withstand the forces required of them. This incorporates materials used, manufacturing techniques, the design of couplings, rigidity/flexibility of the drill steels & drilling method: rotary, percussion or a combination of the two, rotary-percussion. Long holes drilled in rock, whether ...


2

I assume that the 'leg' is tubular steel with pre-drilled holes. The problem with using countersunk screws is twofold, firstly that countersunk they will only make contact with the very edge of the hole and are likely to deform it over time and effectively become less tight. In this sort of situation you want the fixings to be providing a clamping force ...


2

Looks just fine. Aluminum can do that. Long, stringy swarf(chips) is usually less preferable if it can be controlled. What you want to avoid are those chips from getting compacted or clogged in the flutes of the drill. That will make it more difficult for you to drill the holes and eventually impossible. You can try peck drilling your holes. The action ...


1

Agree with Blacksmith37. Note also that aluminum machining processes commonly use an oil-and-water emulsion called "mouse milk" as a lubricant, with a pump-driven feed nozzle aimed right at the hole, and a sump system that catches the used fluid and recycles it through a storage vessel and back to the nozzle again. If you are drilling thousands of holes and ...


1

the way this problem is usually solved is to precisely machine a chunk of metal to fill the inside of the box snugly, and then clamp or bolt that chunk to the drill table. when you start drilling the box wall, the metal core inside it prevents the plastic from flexing. you continue drilling until the bit passes all the way through the plastic wall and ...


1

I've just got a reply from the company: Some of our competitors use an applied outer layer of material to delay their swell curves (mechanical delay). At Reactive, we select the correct polymer for the well, so no fabricated delay system is required. Voila.


1

I don't know about the math, but the answer to the stated question depends on how the bit is driven ( solid drill press , hand held , etc) and the type of drill/point. The point is generally not in the exact center so normally makes an oversize hole . To correct this, a "gun drill" only cuts on one side; and there are other types of points.


1

Call local machine shops, and ask them, if they have a sonic mill. It uses special bits with coolant and ocelats to make the cuts. It can cut accurately through 1/2 inch in about 45 minutes. It shouldn't be too expensive, basically it vibrates the the material.


1

If you can use metalization to create your film, you could create a mask in the required pattern and just coat on top of it. However I assume you only have a laser at your disposal. Your heat affected zone will depend on the speed at which you remove material. Higher power will tend to drill through faster and affect a smaller area but it may create more ...


1

Reamers mentioned in an ericnutsch's answer are good solution (remember that these reamers are designed to increase diameter of existing aperture up to 0,5mm), but may be the better solution is to use senker. But seems your problem is not in using wrong reamer type. I would suggest you to check the straightness of your bit and drill. May be a drill or a bit ...


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