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I think you need to understand what a "tolerance" means in an assembly items. My token view is, a tolerance is the permissible deviation of a part from its ideal design dimension. Additionally, under the non-ideal situation, the assembly will not lose its intended functionality, and desired level of performance. After that, you may start to tighten ...


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Slashes are accepted in the iso/ansi standards as alternative to arrows which are preferred. They have a few advantages over arrows, especially in hand drawn documents. I see these quite often in architects sketches, and furniture designers plans (who seem to prefer these even in digital drawings). If I'm drawing dimensioned things on a whiteboard im about ...


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One could argue that sphericity is a specific type of profile tolerance. You would just need to make sure perfectly opposing points on the surface (or as close to it as possible) are inspected to properly calculate the diameter.


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My interpretation is the following (the dimensions are not exactly accurate).


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This is a very difficult answer to answer within a single post but I'll give it a try. Tolerances, Cost and Machine capability The very first thing you need to remember is that tolerances are indirectly related to cost. More precisely, having tight tolerances means that two objects will be more closely matched compared to two others with looser tolerances. ...


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It's a tricky one. Figure 1. Your isometric is missing this line. Figure 2. A clue. The six-cornered shape is flat so it must be a plane going through these three points. Can you draw it? Figure 3. The correct isometric view. Figure 4. Slide 25 by Shelly Wilke on SlideShare. This and slide 9 may be instructive.


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I see 4-solutions. I added straight lines (in GIMP) to represent canted faces. Either the original posted by NMech along with either or both surfaces as canted are also viable alternatives. (As NMech noted, they could have curvature (except you might then have to show the center of the arc, unless they were b-splines(?).)


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To my experience the slashes were mostly used by civil engineers and architects while the arrows are more common with mechanical engineers. Nowadays, I see more often the arrows. This is probably due to the the fact that it's less effort to draw them properly in a computer system.


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The slash is easier to draw, more forgiving as to where you draw it can be a bit off and nobody minds it. Also it looks more in harmony with the hand lettering we used to do on the days of real Blue print with white lines on prussian blue background. We used to sharpen the tip of an HB lead pencil into a knife edge for lettering and call out arrows, ...


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tl;dr - add the fillets at the end. Step 1: Revolve. This should also include the R10 'lump' on the central axis. Step 2: Define the Elipse Taper. It's stated that the thickness is 11mm and 9.5mm respectively at each end of the spoke. I don't want to start this spoke at the surface of the hub as then my loft would need extending in order to fully intersect ...


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You did pretty well, but @Transistor is correct that the horizontal line needs to be extended. Maybe it looks like this. However, I don't think the inclined plane is correct as there will be another line (shown in red) to connect the corners.


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My shot on the "top view".


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3rd edition Marks HandBook circa 1923 is what I use. When the local library re-opens, check out the modern versions in the reference section.


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There are standards. But that's really putting the cart before the horse. Imagine you're designing ..anything. By default the tolerance is whatever you can expect from the fabrication process if everything is done very poorly, and carelessly. Is the part still acceptable? If so then you're done, no tolerance needed (practically speaking). Most of the time ...


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What you are looking at is UTM or MTM. Similar system but they are basically Northings and Eastings and in CAD your North is your Y value and Eastings your X. The key thing to know in order to convert your Northings and Eastings to Lat and Lon or some other form that Google will recognize is to know which UTM/MTM Zone you are in. In order to figure that ...


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After more than a few days with the wrong key words for a google search, I stumbled on the answer while trying to navigate to the math stack exchange...and the answer was some place completely different: https://www.geogebra.org/m/CgHVUJs8 Great animation. Basically these are the step to figure it out graphically with the assumed initial setup below: Step ...


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Instead of bothering to draw the construction use the parametric tab to do this do the following: assign a locked constraint to your point and 2 to the tangent line so they don't move by mistake. Draw a arbitrary circle, on the side of points where you want the circle center to be. Select the tangent constraint, click circle and line select the coincident ...


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Autocad option One option would be to do it through a 3 point circle. First select the two points and then use the tangent snap to select the third point on the line. Finding the snap location algebraically Assuming: $(x1,y1)$ : the coordinates of the 1st point (P1) $(x2,y2)$ : the coordinates of the 2nd point (P2) the tangent is horizontal (for simplicity) ...


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