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You are essentially asking, "can a cyclone be designed that works without, or against gravity?" and the answer is, of course, yes. Most practical industrial designs can use gravity to increase efficiency or reduce cost, and the equations you've seen need this simplification, but a cyclone doesn't depend on gravity. You just need to whip the air around fast ...


1

Cyclones are designed to quickly and cheaply remove contaminants that would tend to settle out of your process gas (or liquid) if it stopped flowing. They're very good at controlling coarse PM, not so good at controlling fine PM and really quite poor at controlling ultrafine PM. What you're looking for here is so far past ultrafine PM control on this ...


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The use of the word performance might be misleading since a connection to pressure loss is quite reasonable. However, in this context I guess performance is connected to the filtration. Using higher pressure implies in deed a higher pressure loss but it also results in a higher circumferential velocity. Since the main working principle of a hydrocyclone is ...


1

I'm betting that a big part of the discrepancy here lies in the duration of operation. Industrial separators are intended for long term continuous operation, while home cleaners can stand to shut down frequently to be emptied. The act of separating particles is accomplished centrifugally, neither gravity nor a secondary air stream are required. The issue ...


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