3

It could either be an oldham coupling. The photo's a bit blurry. Here's a web page on oldham couplings. https://www.huco.com/products/couplings/oldham-couplings https://www.couplingtips.com/oldham-couplings/what-do-you-know-about-oldham-couplings/ or it could be a Flexible flange coupling


2

Could you not make a guide of sort to constrain the plunger action on the load cell to be along the right axis. Something like that (probably can do something better, but that's all I had time to do): so fairly tight around the diameter of the pin (say 5.5mm hole), and resting on the surfaces of the load cell to ensure perpendicularity. Can the plunger move ...


2

That might be overkill in your application (but I don't know). Figure 1. A random rigid flange coupling from an image search. A rigid flange coupling may be a more economic choice if it suits. From the comments: What are the benefits of a rigid flange compared to a split flange beside costs? Doesn't the flexible coupler give more friction? A flexible ...


2

Those four screws are usually tightened against a flat or flats machined on the two shafts. That prevents any slipping and possible damage to either shaft.


2

I am going to say that no, your chosen coupling would not work. Based on the K-K cross-section in the drawing, there would be a large portion of the shaft that is not in contact with the coupling. I believe what you need is a coupling where it is held against a flat in the shaft by a set screw, like the one here (though in your size): https://www.omc-...


2

The plate allows for small amounts of angular misalignment between the input and output shafts.


1

There is one pin in each shaft, so each pin takes the full load but in two places. This is known as double shear. If you put 2 pins for each shaft then there would be 4 sections of pin taking the load so the pins would need re-sizing, otherwise they would be too strong and something else more expensive will break.


1

You can use Herringbone gears. Depending on your geometric restrictions there are several configurations that may do the job. .


1

There are dozens of ways to connect to the shaft of a motor, A few examples: set screw/grub screw through taper pin interference fit split ring taper lock welded keyway & key (most common industrial use) Each of these has a torque spec that I think you can find in a mechanical engineer's handbook. There are probably decades old free ones on the ...


1

These drive clutches can be used to absorb drive train shocks and/or slight mis-alignments of the two shafts. These are available in several sizes and capacities. Flexible coupling or flexible drive coupling or flexible shaft couplings, see: enter link description here


1

Look for overrunning clutch or power transmission elements. You may find a lot of info in Ringspann site: Ringspann power transmission section Or here: Ringspann catalogue


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