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The illustration below is in response to your comment on alephzero's answer. I think you are confused with the stress on an inclined plane, after ddelection/rotation, that will have the force components $N $&$ S$ as shown. Assume a finite strip with unit width, in direction of $"Z", A_X = 1 * \Delta L = \Delta L$, $\sum \delta_Z = N cos\theta/\Delta L + ...


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Some other answer have touched upon this, but I think it needs to be made explicit: Your mistake is in thinking that civil engineering is about making the lightest structure possible. It's not. Instead, it's about making the most cost-effective structure possible. Give me a material that weighs a billion tons per cubic centimeter but is cheap enough to let ...


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I will make a slight add to the answers given here already, as follows. Take the case of a bridge. When loaded, some parts of it will be in compression, other parts will be in tension. The designer's job is to manage the stress levels in the most cost-effective manner. If a certain amount of concrete is capable of handling the compressive stresses less ...


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A partial listing ( in addition to the previous answer) ; for reinforced concrete only simple generic shapes are needed ( bars) while steel only needs "I" , "H" beams, gussets, fasteners, welding . Careful inventory control of the previous steel items. Coating of these shapes to reduce rust during construction. Inspection to verify the ...


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The most important advantage of reinforced concrete over pure steel structure is availability. Many countries/regions on earth rely on imports for general goods production needs, the cost of steel can run prohibitively high compared to concrete. The next advantage is weight. In certain types of structure weight counts, such as underwater powerhouse. However, ...


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