14

Have you looked at the size of one of those maritime diesel engines? They are larger than your car and need to deliver a lot of power to move and power the ship. That takes a lot of fuel so it's cheaper to burn more cheaper fuel even if it is of inferior quality. The bigger size also lets it use wider fuel lines so the viscosity is less of an issue. You also ...


13

To understand how these fuels behave in internal combustion (IC) engines, you need to first understand the properties of the fuels and how they differ. Fuel Properties Both petrol (gasoline) and diesel are lighter-than-water organic liquids, most commonly produced from petroleum. Diesel requires much less effort to produce—you can make it yourself from ...


11

If you can replicate what you report above under controlled conditions then you can retire for life next year. Really. The overwhelming opinion by all reputable test houses or suitably competent careful and honest individuals is that for combustion improvement by treating the **fuel* with magnets you'd be just as well off rubbing on snake oil - or drinking ...


9

It depends on flue gas temperature. High temperature $(>250\ \textrm{C})$: use galvanized steel. Low temperature $(<250\ \textrm{C})$, use stainless steel or PVC as appropriate. See below for an explanation. Flues conveying higher temperature flue gas are typically made from galvanized, rolled, plain steel, as sulfuric acid condensation doesn't ...


9

It depends on what you mean by "diesel-like". If you mean an engine with compression ignition running on gaseous fuel, then the answer is no. The high autoignition temperature of fuels such as natural gas prohibits sparkless ignition of pure natural gas1. @mart is right that compression ignition engines running on gaseous fuels need a pilot fuel which ...


8

Putting diesel fuel in a gasoline engine is just about impossible. Diesel fuel nozzles are larger than gasoline nozzles, and modern gas caps are too small for diesel nozzles to fit into. However, if you managed to get it in there, the diesel fuel is too heavy and evaporates too slowly for the spark plugs to ignite it effectively. One source says that it won'...


7

Lighters usually use Butane. Gas bottles use some or all Propane. Propane pressures are MUCH higher. A plastic 'tank' filled with Propane would probably explode. As size increases the container strength must be increased disproportionately. As temperatures increase pressures rise FAR faster than changes in absolute temperature. We understand from ...


7

Diesels are started by using a combination of "glow plugs" and a starter motor. Once the diesel gets going, combustion is caused by compression of the mixture. Initially, the cylinder walls can be so cold that they cool the mixture during compression enough to not have it ignite. Each cylinder has a glow plug that provides a small spot of hot surface that ...


7

Well, you'd still need something to generate the high voltage for the spark, so there isn't much overall simplification. A magneto driven by points is about as simple as it gets. But more importantly, the spark does not always occur at TDC — in fact, in most operating regimes for most engines, it never does. In order to get the best efficiency, the ...


5

If you get complete combustion of any hydrocarbon fuel, your products will be primarily $CO_2$ and $H_2O$. Other products will be present in quantities too small to be relevant to the heat losses that you're looking at. These two gases will change the heat capacity, conductivity and density of the flame and your exhaust gases. So heat heat transfer ...


5

One consideration is the relative densities of hydrocarbon fuels compared to hydrogen. If we assume that the fuels are completely vapourised in the combustion chamber then the mass of fuel depends on the volume, temperature and pressure. So energy density per kg doesn't necessarily tell you much about how many molecules of fuel you can get in one charge or ...


5

Simple economics. Marine engines consume enormous amounts of fuel, so in order to reduce operating costs, they use the cheapest, least desirable sludge that the oil refineries can produce.


5

The easy question Do any of the components above have higher costs to society than CO2 per same unit of measure (e.g. gram, kilogram, or ton)? Yes, absolutely. This should come as no surprise given the composition of the exhaust—it's mostly inert gases. Water vapor, CO2 and nitrogen gas are all products of the various reactions taking place in the vehicle'...


5

A diesel engine for a car needs a fuel which is liquid even in winter. This fuel should contain a very small amount of sulfur to limit air pollution. The marine bunker oil is not liquid at room temperature, it has to be heated to about 50 °C before pumping out of the tank and to about 130 to 140 °C before injecting it into the cylinders. It contains a lot ...


5

The speed of exhaust gases from a stack is governed (approximately) by: $V=C\sqrt{2gH\frac{T_i-T_o}{T_i}}$, where: $C$ is the discharge coefficient (typically between 0.65-0.7, but can vary based on the inlet and outlet geometry) $g$ is the acceleration due to gravity, approximately $9.81 m/s^2$ or $32.2 ft/s^2$ $H$ is the height of the chimney $T_i$ is ...


5

From the Wikipedia article: All diesel engines can be considered to be lean-burning with respect to the total volume, however the fuel and air is not well mixed before the combustion. Most of the combustion occurs in rich zones around small droplets of fuel. Locally rich combustion like this is a source of NOx and particles.


5

Normally fans are not custom built by a company that does not build fans. The concept of a centrifugal fan is not particularly complicated, but it is difficult to achieve target flow rate, pressure, and efficiency if your company does not do it on a daily basis. If you are not able to purchase a fan, another option is to copy someone else's simple straight ...


5

The maximum temperature is the adiabatic flame (combustion) temperature. All else being equal, the combustion temperature will approach this to the extent that using higher pressure air puts the reaction process closer to being truly adiabatic. The adiabatic flame temperature is determined by assuming stoichiometric feed to full reaction with all combustion ...


4

These are things that installers and builders can control and understand. They aren't interested in running the equations themselves, they just have a customer who is asking for a product. So the industry has settled on some basic standards, and as long as everyone builds according to code and the devices is rated for indoor use, then they only need either ...


4

The only ones I know of are pilot-oil gas motors. The ones I know burn biogas or methane plus a small amount of oil, typically rape oil. The oil is neccesary for combustion but the biggest part of the power comes from the gasous fuel. Typically, the lower limit for oil consumption is about 5% (by energy content), the engines can run on oil solely. ...


4

On this website, Wartsila states it has made diesel-gas engines and that the first ones have been operating for 70 000 hours.


4

The short answer is that if the air in or around your home is not safe and breathable, you need to leave the area and possibly seek medical attention. You're extremely unlikely to be able to MacGyver your way out of a truly life-threatening air quality event caused by a wildfire (or any comparable industrial accident). Follow the advice laid out in the CDC ...


4

Do the math. Pick a reference car and get its fuel milage at some speed. From that you can compute the amount of gasoline used in one minute. Now look at the chemistry of gasoline and figure out how much oxygen your one minute worth of gasoline requires to completely burn. There are more details going on in a internal combustion engine, like nitrogen ...


4

Depending on fuel, a flame has a certain propagation speed - the speed with which the flame wanders through the medium. If the fuel - oxygen mixture moves faster through the pipe than the propagation speed of the flame, the flame can't 'walk'back. Like trying to run on a threadmill that's to fast. The speed of the fuel-air mixture depends on the area of the ...


3

If the tube is acting as a chimney, then i would first try a longer tube, and add lots of insulation to the outside of it too. The hotter gases inside it would be less dense and want to rise faster, the longer tube gives the gases more time to accelerate. Basically stuff to increase the draft of the chimney


3

There are are three independent problems with air containing "smoke" from a fire: Particles Poisonous or unhealthy combustion gasses. Oxygen depletion. Unless you're really close to the fire, #1 is the biggest problem. As you already found, plain old mechanical filtration is the simplest way to address this. There are commercial air filters for HVAC ...


3

Just to add some unique engineering solutions that are used, depending upon applications: Brick works wonders - it resists the acid in the smoke well and can withstand the heat. Not metal, but well worth it if the application is right. For power plants, typical material use is acid brick lined steel. For industry, such as fume exhaust of potential ...


3

Reading through the site I would say no. Using the exhaust gas as input for the turbine will have horrible efficiencies for powering everything he listed. Also, on the "How turbochargers work" page he stated that he uses the compressed air from the turbocharger to directly power a turbine. A turbine and a compressor can be thought of as opposite cycles of ...


3

Well first and foremost, refiners are a business so they must make the decisions that make them the most money. Considering this, lets think about cracking and isomerization via catalysis. The refiner is going to require additional reactors, piping and pumping, most likely additional distillation columns, catalyst loading etc. The energy alone to do ...


3

After burner primary task is to add extra thrust to a jet engine by heating the jet stream after the turbine via injecting and burning fuel in it. The reason they just don't add more fuel in the jet engine before turbine even though it would be more economical is the very high temperatures of the engine just before the turbine. The fuel injection into the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible